Nov 11, 2020

Bupa partnership provides UK workplaces with health tracking

healthcare monitoring
healthcare app
Employee healthcare
Leila Hawkins
2 min
Bupa partnership provides UK workplaces with health tracking
Bupa has partnered with Well.Me to give employees a digital health monitoring platform in the workplace...

Healthcare insurer Bupa is working with Well.Me, creators of a digital healthcare tool that monitors the health and wellbeing of employees while they're in the workplace. 

As a result of the collaboration, UK workplaces that are business customers of Bupa Health Service will be provided with health monitoring stations. These Wellpoint health stations will give employees the ability to actively monitor their health measurements, including details of their exercise regime, nutrition and sleep patterns. 

This data is then fed into Be.Me, an app containing health tracking software available to individuals who have attended a health assessment at a Bupa Health Clinic. 

This tool will allow them to record metrics such as blood pressure, resting heart rate and BMI, so they can identify potential issues and make lifestyle changes if necessary. 

Looking ahead, Bupa is planning to introduce the monitoring app to insurance customers too.

“The provision of health monitoring and tracking by Bupa Health Services for its business clients opens up a new world of health management for employees” explained Keith Lewis, CEO of Well.Me. 

“The COVID-19 crisis has shown us the importance of maintaining optimal health and the need to manage conditions such as obesity and high blood pressure. Through the Be.Me app, users will have the tools to monitor and track their key health metrics and we are delighted that Well.Me has been able to play a major role in delivering this service.” 

Sarah Melia, Managing Director at Bupa Health Clinics, added: “There has never been a time when the monitoring and management of health has been more important. 

“Well.Me has been an integral partner in the delivery of the Be.Me app and together with the deployment of Wellpoints we hope to make a real impact in improving the health of the nation’s workforce.”

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May 14, 2021

Digital health passports - 4 quick facts

covid-19vaccine
healthpassport
vaccinepassport
Data
4 min
The rollout of a digital health passport has become the subject of much confusion and debate. Here is we know so far.

As COVID-19 vaccination programmes roll out around the world, policy makers and the private sector are engaged in intense debates over vaccine passports and whether they are the solution to re-opening economies and getting back to “normal”. 

With various governments using different systems there is confusion over how universally accepted a digital health passport will be, and whether our private data will remain private. Here is we know about vaccination passports so far. 

1. Many countries will require proof of vaccination status 

Most international travel has been on pause during the pandemic, with strict quarantine measures in place around the world. For travel to "open up" again, it is likely that vaccine status, COVID-19 status or a combination of the two will be required before you're able to enter another country. 

The European Union is behind a “Digital Green Certificate" that would enable people to show they have been vaccinated, had a negative test, or have recovered from the virus in order to travel across its 27 member countries, although MEPs have also said these will not be a precondition to exercise the right to free movement.

The UK is planning to use its existing National Health Service (NHS) track and trace app as a health passport for British people to travel abroad.  

There are no plans to implement a nationwide health passport in the US so far, and there is fierce, partisan opposition to the idea; however Hawaii and New York State have launched passport programmes that enable vaccinated people to skip quarantine for inter-state travel. 

Health passports are also being contemplated by the hospitality and entertainment industries - for example for entry to live music events and bars. Israel, which has the highest vaccination rate in the world, has launched a "green passport" for people to show at gyms, venues and synagogues, however there have been problems with access and data privacy. 

2. They're not conventional passports - they're digital

Calling them "passports" is a bit of a misnomer, as most of the proposed certificates are digital. The CommonPass, for example, saves the user's test results onto their mobile device, along with any other necessary health screening information. The pass then generates a QR code which can be printed or scanned by airline staff to confirm the passenger's health status. It's already being used by major airlines including Lufthansa, United Airlines, and Virgin Atlantic. 

 In India, the health ministry has said that everyone who has been vaccinated will get a QR code-based electronic certificate. 

Additionally China has implemented an app-based health code system that uses travel and medical data to give people a colour-based rating, showing how likely it is that they have COVID-19 and whether they should self-isolate. 

3. Numerous tech companies have already created health passports

A number of tech companies big and small have already entered this space, with Microsoft’s CoronaPass, IBM’s Digital Health Pass, VaxAtlas and SafeFun among the many initiatives that have sprung up catering to different audiences - SafeFun is aimed at consumers to be able to socialise, while the SafeAccess app is specifically for workplaces. 

This raises issues around standardisation - with so many different types of digital passport available, there will need to be consensus from venues, businesses and airports on how they work and whether they are accepted. 

4. There are fraud and privacy concerns 

Research by McAfee recently found a growing black market for fake COVID-19 test results and vaccination certificates

Enforcing vaccine certification via an app would exclude people who do not own a smartphone. It also has the potential to reinforce existing inequalities, for example pregnant women, who are currently ineligible for vaccination in many parts of the world, and would therefore be unable to participate in the same activities as non-pregnant women. 

Last but not least, many have raised concerns over data privacy, which is a major cause of the divisions over whether or not to adopt them. Experts have said they fear vaccination information could be linked to other personal data to create a “personal risk score” that could then be subject to abuse. 

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