Jun 17, 2021

Check Point: Securing the future of enterprise IT

HOOPP
Checkpoint
3 min
Erez Yarkoni, Global VP, explains how a three-way partnership between Check Point, HOOPP, and Microsoft is yielding optimum cloud security

Cybersecurity solutions provider Check Point was founded in 1993 with a mission to secure ‘everything,’ and that includes the cloud. Conscious that nothing remains static in the digital world, the company prides itself on an ability to integrate new technology with its solutions. Across almost three decades in operation, Check Point, with its team of over 3,500 experts, has become adept at protecting networks, endpoints, mobile, IoT, and cloud.

“The pandemic has been somewhat of an accelerator in the evolution of cyber risk,” explains Erez Yarkoni, Global VP for Cloud Business. “We had remote workers and cloud adoption a long time beforehand, but now the volume and surface area is far greater.” Formerly a CIO for several big-name telcos before joining Check Point in 2019, Yarkoni considers the cloud to be “part of [his] heritage” and one of modern IT’s most valuable tools.

Check Point has three important ‘product families’, Quantum, CloudGuard, and Harmony, with each one providing another layer of holistic IT protection:

  • Quantum: secures enterprise networks from sophisticated cyber attacks
  • CloudGuard: acts as a scalable and unified cloud-native security platform for the protection of any cloud
  • Harmony: protects remote users and devices from cyber threats that might compromise organisational data

 

However, more than just providing security, Yarkoni emphasises the need for software to be proactive and minimise the possibility of threats in the first instance. This is something Check Point assuredly delivers, “the industry recognises that preventing, not just detecting, is crucial. Check Point has one platform that gives customers the end-to-end cover they need; they don't have to go anywhere else. That level of threat prevention capability is core to our DNA and across all three product lines.”

In many ways, Check Point’s solutions’ capabilities have actually converged to meet the exact working requirements of contemporary enterprise IT. As more companies embark on their own digital transformation journeys in the wake of COVID-19, the inevitability of unforeseen threats increases, which also makes forming security-based partnerships essential. Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan (HOOPP) sought out Check Point for this very reason when it was in the process of selecting Microsoft Azure as its cloud provider. “Let's be clear: Azure is a secure cloud, but when you operate in a cloud you need several layers of security and governance to prevent mistakes from becoming risks,” Yarkoni clarifies. 

The partnership is a distinctly three-way split, with each bringing its own core expertise and competencies. More than that, Check Point, HOOPP and Microsoft are all invested in deepening their understanding of each other at an engineering and developmental level. “Both of our organisations (Check Point and Microsoft) are customer-obsessed: we look at the problem from the eyes of the customer and ask, ‘Are we creating value?’” That kind of focus is proving to be invaluable in the digital era, when the challenges and threats of tomorrow remain unpredictable. In this climate, only the best protected will survive and Check Point is standing by, ready to help. 

“HOOPP is an amazing organisation,” concludes Yarkoni. “For us to be successful with a customer and be selected as a partner is actually a badge of honor. It says, ‘We passed a very intense and in-depth inspection by very smart people,’ and for me that’s the best thing about working with organisations like HOOPP.”

 

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Aug 4, 2021

The next generation of wearable technology

wearabletech
medicaldevices
Technology
remotemonitoring
5 min
The next generation of wearable technology
Wearable technology has evolved massively since Fitbits appeared. We take a look at three key areas of innovation.

Wearable technology for healthcare has evolved significantly since Fitbits started becoming household items. The combined possibilities of tracking data, constantly advancing technology , and a pandemic that forced most of the world to receive healthcare at home for more than a year, has led to huge innovations in wearable devices that do everything from reduce hospital stays to monitor the menstrual cycle.  

Post-operative care

A complicated operation like an organ transplant typically requires a lengthy stay in hospital and significant post-op care. Two major reasons for this are to prevent wounds from becoming infected, and regaining mobility. But what if there was a device patients could easily wear that helped both these areas so they could return home sooner? 

geko™ is the name of a wearable created by British company Sky Medical Technology, specifically for patients who have had a kidney transplant. This small muscle pump activator is worn round the leg, transmitting painless electrical pulses to stimulate blood flow. 

This prevents oedema, a common symptom of kidney disease caused by swelling due to a build-up of fluids, typically in the legs and ankles. 

In a randomised controlled clinical trial at  Canada's Lawson Health Research Institute,  221 transplant patients were either given a conventional compression stocking or the geko™ device for six days after their operation. 

Researchers found that the patients wearing geko™ had less fluid retention as they were able to urinate more frequently. They experienced 31 per cent less swelling, and were able to return home several days earlier than patients wearing the compression stocking. 

Perhaps the most remarkable outcome was the reduction in surgical site infections by nearly 60 per cent. Infections acquired in hospitals remain a huge problem worldwide, and transplant patients are at a particularly higher risk because of the immunosuppressant medication they need after an operation. 

Dr. Alp Sener, who led the trial, said: "The study results have been both surprising and exciting. Not only have we cut down wound infection rates, but we have also seen a considerable improvement in the new organ's function following transplantation. Patients reported feeling more satisfied with the transplant process and are more mobile."

Sener is the Chair and Chief of Urology at Western University in Ontario. He added: "Reducing infection means a much better outcome for the patient and considering that recent data shows wound infections can cost the health care system thousands of dollars per person, it's a win-win situation."

Monitoring menstrual cycles

British medical device company Fertility Focus launched OvuFirst this year, a wearable sensor that helps women monitor their menstrual cycles. Worn on the arm or wrist overnight, it is alleged to be over 90% accurate at predicting ovulation, even for women with irregular cycles. 

It works by measuring temperature multiple times through the night. A woman's body temperature tends to dip slightly just before the ovary releases an egg; 24 hours later it rises and remains at the same level for several days. 

By downloading data from the OvuFirst sensor to a synchronised app each morning, it can track the ovulation period within an eight day window. 

The sensor works in a similar way to the company's existing product OvuSense, which is inserted like a tampon. While OvuSense is aimed at women who have been trying to conceive for a while, the wearable version is for women who are in the first months of trying to conceive, designed to be as non-invasive and  simple to use as possible. 

“We took our revolutionary OvuSense patented technology proven in over 190,000 cycles of use, and used it to develop and test the most accurate skin-worn fertility monitoring sensor available on the market,” CEO Robert Milnes explained when the product launched. 

“We are proud to offer a convenient and easy-to-use solution to assist and support women during the early stages of their fertility journey, whether that is trying to start a family, or simply learning more about their bodies and cycles.” 

Advanced blood pressure monitoring

Perhaps the most common application of wearable technology is for measuring blood pressure. The prevalence of hypertension and its associated risks (it's frequently labelled "the silent killer") makes frequent blood pressure checks vital. 

Traditionally blood pressure monitors that work remotely have been uncomfortable, noisy and disruptive, until smartwatches were enabled to do this, leading to a wide variety of cuffless devices. 

The technology within these devices is evolving too. Pulse Transit Time (PTT) is the most common type of  cuffless blood pressure monitors, the Apple Watch being one example. 

However PTT monitors use two sensors and need frequent calibration. PPG blood pressure monitors (or photoplethysmography to give their full name) only have one sensor and don't need to be calibrated. 

Valencell is a US-based biometric company that develops PPG sensors, and Dr. Steven LeBoeuf, President and Co-Founder, believes that PPG monitors are more accurate. "The advent of modern machine learning tools has helped earn PPG a solid edge in terms of accuracy, generality, and convenience" he says. "This is because the complexity of the PPG waveform and the richness of its features provide more information for machine learning approaches to “connect the dots” between PPG and blood pressure. " 

Calibration-free, PPG monitoring is ideal for small wearable devices, and the remote blood pressure market is growing steadily each year -  by 2025 it is projected to be worth almost $3 billion

"By enabling accurate, cuffless, calibration-free blood pressure monitoring within familiar wearable form-factors, PPG-based monitoring solves this final technical challenge" LeBoeuf says. "Ultimately, the marketplace will see finger clips, rings, smartwatches, headphones, hearing aids, chest patches, and more incorporating PPG-BP technology. This will enable seamless monitoring throughout one’s daily activities, providing the feedback needed to target user-specific therapies, managing hypertension, improving public health, and reducing medical costs." 

  • This article appears in the August issue of Healthcare 

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