May 17, 2020

The first comprehensive blockchain-supported Personal Care Record Platform has been launched

Technology
Digital health
healthcare services
UK
Catherine Sturman
3 min
Blockchain giant Guardtime has today announced the launch of the world’s first comprehensive blockchain-supported Personal Care Record Platform, MyPCR...

Blockchain giant Guardtime has today announced the launch of the world’s first comprehensive blockchain-supported Personal Care Record Platform, MyPCR, alongside industry partners, Instant Access Medical and Healthcare Gateway.

Using Healthcare Gateway’s Medical Interoperability Gateway, MyPCR provides up to 30mn UK NHS patients with instant access to their primary care information, their personal care pathways and medication adherence support through their smartphone.

The platform is designed to deliver immutable proof of health data provenance and integrity, GDPR patient data rights management and automated verification of medication adherence.

In the US, it is estimated that medication non-adherence adds an additional $290bn annually in health-care costs. It's the leading cause of preventable morbidity and mortality, responsible for 30% to 50% of treatment failures and 125,000 deaths annually.

As the industry scrambles to improve quality and lower costs, non-adherence to medication is an area that everybody within the healthcare ecosystem needs a solution for: from providers and insurers, to lifescience companies and patients.

Patient medication adherence encompasses the continuous monitoring and verification of patients to a specific, personalised treatment plan or Personal Care Pathway (PCP). PCPs are critical to maintaining adherence and positive health outcomes for patients, especially those with long term conditions.

Delivering this electronically and at scale; however’ has been impossible to date due to challenges of capturing patient consent and a secure mechanism to deliver personal care information to a patient in a timely and compliant way.

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The MyPCR platform interfaces with all three major UK NHS GP systems enabling National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) based personal care pathways to be rolled out.

“Personal Care Pathways enable significant cost efficiencies, ensuring patients are continuously updated on their treatment path, with 360-degree feedback of their progress to their GP,” explained Glen Ogden, General Manager, Guardtime Health.

“Medication adherence is the best way to ensure positive health outcomes for patients at the earliest opportunity and an essential tool in combatting rising medical costs. Over 30m million patients can benefit from this platform immediately, in the knowledge their data is safe and secure conforming to the very latest standards for data privacy, security and Integrity.”

“Healthcare Gateway have been very successful at brokering real time information between clinical settings for a number of years, and we’re excited to be working with Instant Access Medical in the roll out of MyPCR,” commented Liam King, Director of Commercial and Customer Experience, Healthcare Gateway.

“This technology puts the patient at the centre of their care, where patient consent and data sharing agreements permit.”

“Personal Care Pathways are vital to encouraging self-care and to improving the long-term health of patients. They are a core component in ensuring patients have complete access to personalised self-management of their treatment end to end,” added Dr Stan Shepherd, CEO Instant Access Medical.

“Guardtime’s KSI Blockchain is a fundamental component to delivering this service, providing end to end security of records in transit, guaranteeing immutable integrity for every patient record and ensuring GDPR compliance for patient consent.” 

 

 

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Jun 23, 2021

NHSX releases new data plans, experts call for transparency

medicalrecords
patientdata
NHS
privacy
3 min
NHSX has published a new strategy for patient data sharing, with experts calling for transparency

Patients in England will get "greater control" over their health and care data according to new proposals set out by the government. 

In a new draft strategy called "Data saves lives: reshaping health and social care with data", Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock says that more effective use of data will deliver better patient-focused care. "This strategy seeks to put people in control of their own data, while supporting the NHS in creating a modernised system fit for the 21st century which puts patients and staff in pole position." 

Under the new plans people will be able to access their medical records from different parts of the health system through different applications, to access test results, medication lists, procedures and care plans. 

The strategy, published by NHSX, the government department that sets policies for the use of technology within the NHS, follows delays to the creation of a central database of patient records amid concerns over data sharing and a lack of transparency, with critics saying that only a small proportion of the public were made aware of the plans and the choice to opt out. 

Kevin Curran,  senior member of The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and Professor of Cybersecurity at the University of Ulster, says that moving health records online raises concerns. "The move to an online app does seem like a natural progression, however there is a difference between having computerised records within our healthcare IT infrastructure and having those records reside on a public facing server. 

"Having records inhouse limits the range and type of access – it's far more difficult for remote hackers" Curran said. "There are techniques that healthcare organisations can use to reduce the risk of future data breaches. One way is to make it ‘opt in’, so patients have the choice to decide whether their medical information is moved to a public facing service so that they can access it. 

"However, those who do not opt in or download the app instead should have their records hosted in a non-public-facing cloud service. This way, if a data breach does occur, those who never used the app, or not wanted to, will not have had their details released." 

The new strategy has been welcomed by some, with an emphasis on the need for transparency.  Adam Steventon, Director of Data Analytics at the Health Foundation, said: "Health data has played a critical role in the last year – from tracking COVID-19 outbreaks and developing treatments, to getting people booked in for their vaccines. It is critical that the use of data is accelerated if the NHS is to tackle the backlog of care and address the massive health challenges facing the country. 

"It is particularly positive that the government has committed to building analytical and data science capability in the NHS and to improving data on social care. To ensure the full potential of data can be realised, the government must ensure transparency on how it will be used and the rights and options people have, as well as engaging with the public and health care professionals to build trust and show people how their data can improve the NHS and save lives." 

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