May 17, 2020

Generali Global Assistance ramps up its healthcare ambitions

healthcare
USA
transportation
Lyft
Catherine Sturman
2 min
medical vehicle
Insurance company Generali Global Assistance is looking to further its healthcare ambitions by recently partnering with rideshare company Lyft. The agre...

Insurance company  Generali Global Assistance is looking to further its healthcare ambitions by recently partnering with rideshare company Lyft. The agreement will see the companies support those who suffer from minor inconveniences, to life-threatening medical situation and all those in-between in its new suite of service offerings.

Housing over 50 accident, health, property and casualty insurers amongst the clients which utilise its services, the deal will see help ensure that set-up and billing for covered transports for insured and corporate travellers can be managed efficiently, with less travel interruption and higher productivity for travellers. The first of many partnerships to come in future, the deal will see a reduction in overall ground transport costs.

"This partnership with Generali Global Assistance enables us to get one step closer to our mission of improving people's lives with the world's best transportation," said Dan Trigub, Head of West Coast Healthcare Partnerships at Lyft.

 "Together, we're working to provide even more customers with an efficient and effective transportation solution in a variety of situations – improving transit options for millions of their customers across the country."

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Generali Global Assistance has also recently acquired tech-enabled caregiver marketplace CareLinx, which provides and improves access to affordable, quality home care for families, large health systems, and insurance companies.

Chris Carnicelli, CEO of Generali Global Assistance, said: “Healthcare in general, and CareLinx in particular, have a direct synergy with our value proposition of providing ‘non-stop caring’ to our customers.

As the senior population continues to rise, both families and health systems are faced with the dilemma of how to provide an adequate level of quality, but affordable care.

CareLinx shares our mission of improving lives through services that can lessen the impacts of life’s most stressful periods and by providing them with the necessary resources to rapidly expand their market share, we believe we will help them positively affect change to senior care services in the United States.”

Lyft is currently integrated with CareLinx, providing a seamless delivery of patient centered care. Consequently, CareLinx and Lyft have developed CareRides, which has become an essential door-through-door transportation service to increase freedom and mobility for millions of individuals who need extra support across the US.

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Jun 24, 2021

Data de-identification - why it matters in healthcare

dataprivacy
patientdata
electronicmedicalrecords
datadeidentification
3 min
Riddhiman Das, co-founder and CEO of data privacy startup TripleBlind tells us why data de-identification is important in the healthcare sector

Large amounts of healthcare data is generated yet goes unused due to privacy concerns. To address this, data privacy firm TripleBlind has created Blind De-identification, a new approach that allows healthcare organisations to use patient data while eliminating the possibility of the user learning anything about the patient’s identity. 

We asked Riddhiman Das, co-founder and CEO to tell us more about data de-identification. 

Why is data de-identification important in healthcare? 
Blind De-identification allows every attribute of any given dataset to be used, even at an individual level, while being compliant to privacy laws, rules, and regulations by default.

Governments around the world are adopting global data privacy and residency laws like GDPR, which prohibit citizens’ personally identifiable information data from leaving the borders of the country. While great for data protection, data residency laws result in global silos of inaccessible data. TripleBlind allows computations to be done on enterprise-wise global data, while enforcing data residency regulations. 

In the US, HIPAA compliance has relied on what is called the Safe Harbor method, which requires removing 18 types of personal patient identifiers like names, email addresses, and medical record numbers. The Safe Harbor method can be too restrictive with the data or can leave too many indirect identifiers, which puts the patient data security at risk. Getting de-identification wrong could make an organisation liable for a costly mistake.

What does TripleBlind's solution do? 
With TripleBlind, data is legally de-identified in real time with practically 0% probability of re-identification. Our solution allows analytics on data containing personally identifiable information and protected health information  with zero possibility of re-identifying an individual from the dataset. This allows healthcare organisations to access more meaningful data, creating more accurate and less biased results.

For example, a healthcare drug researcher in a rural, predominantly white area, would only have patient data that would reflect their local population. With TripleBlind’s de-identification, they could more easily leverage third-party data from another healthcare facility in a more diverse region, creating a more complete data set that more accurately reflects the larger population. This has the possibility to create more accurate diagnoses and better drug results for more diverse populations.

How can healthcare organisations use this in practice? 
TripleBlind is blind to all data and algorithms. That means we never take possession of customer data. We only route traffic between entities, enforce permissions, and provide audit trails. The enterprise’s data remains under their control. TripleBlind does not host, copy or control their data, algorithms or other information assets, ever. 

We facilitate a connection to an encrypted version of their information assets. Our technology allows the algorithms and data to interact in an encrypted space that only exists for the duration of the operation. Organisations use their existing infrastructure, so it’s not hardware dependent.

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