Sep 29, 2020

New e-rostering for tablets will help clinicians on the go

erostering
People Management
NHS
Leila Hawkins
2 min
New e-rostering for tablets will help clinicians on the go
Next generation version of platform aims to free up clinicians' time...

UK software company Allocate is rolling out a new version of its people management platform HealthRoster, designed to make electronic rostering faster and simpler for healthcare professionals.

HealthRoster 11 has been designed for tablets as well as computers with the aim of helping with the management and rostering of staff whether at their desks or on-the-go. The new platform offers an improved user interface and dashboard display that summarises information on one screen, making it faster to access. 

The new platform has been developed in conjunction with nine private and NHS Trusts, with input from staff and clinicians to help the platform developers understand how best it can support healthcare workers, particularly during times of increased demand.

Andrew Stocken, E-Systems Implementation Officer at Aneurin Bevan University Health Board in Wales, says the new version of the software is more visual and user-friendly. "It will make a big difference when it comes to training new teams. Reporting is more streamlined meaning you don’t have to export reports into Excel. But the biggest win is being able to use the software on a tablet which means staff can be more mobile, which is especially important for clinicians.”

Allocate's erostering software is already in use at National Health Service (NHS) hospitals througout the UK, including the temporary Nightingale Hospital Yorkshire and Humber built to accomodate patients during the Covid-19 pandemic. As part of the government's Long Term Plan for the NHS, all clinical staff should aim to be rostered electronically by 2021

Simon Courage, Chief Solutions Architect at Allocate, explains: “We have seen a significant shift in e-rostering over the last ten years and its one that is constantly evolving. Whilst initially e-rostering was focused on linking shifts and hours worked to payroll, now it plays a vital role in safe staffing, staff experience and organisational responsiveness.  

"With Covid-19 forcing a transformation in the deployment of staff, e-rostering is once again a vital tool in the management of resources as healthcare organisations rapidly assess and redeploy skills based on acute needs as they continue to respond to the pandemic. HealthRoster 11 supports this by delivering an improved rostering experience for clinicians and administrative staff alike, which will improve efficiencies and will allow healthcare professionals to spend more time caring on the front line.”

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Jun 21, 2021

How health plans can reduce healthcare inequalities

healthcareinequalities
COVID19
healthplan
sdoh
4 min
Jim Clement from Inovalon on the role of health plans in improving access to healthcare

The COVID-19 pandemic has put inequalities accessing the healthcare system in the spotlight. Jim Clement, Vice President of Product & Services at cloud provider Inovalon, tells us that health plans play the most integral role in advancing the health equity movement.

Why did it a global pandemic to highlight the issue of healthcare inequities? 

Health inequity in the US has been well understood by healthcare professionals for many years, but it has become more evident due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It wasn’t until the racial and ethnic differential seen in response to COVID-19 related infections, deaths and vaccinations that many Americans became acutely aware of the health inequity due to sociodemographic factors such as race, geography, education and income.

Fortunately, there’s now a growing health equity movement afoot in America which aims to improve public health and achieve equity in health status for all people by ensuring opportunities are available to attain the highest level of health. While the entire healthcare ecosystem is important to this transformation, it is health plans that arguably play the most integral role.

How can health plans help? 

Achieving health equity means obstacles to health must be removed, including poverty, discrimination, powerlessness, and lack of access to the basics like physicians, hospitals, medicine, technology, and health education. This is not only a social justice initiative, but also a clear call to action for health plan organisations that are bearing the economic brunt of the costs due to health disparities. 

Health plan organisations that recognise the alignment between efforts to improve health equity and broader member engagement initiatives will be in the best position to move the needle. Plans must also understand that the provision of medical services within hospital walls, physician offices and other health services providers is necessary, but not sufficient. 

By recognising that health inequity also includes non-medical factors such as employment, income, housing, transportation, childcare, and more, plans will be better equipped to ensure their members are set up for success. 

What do healthcare providers need to do generally to address inequities? 

Outreach by both health plans and providers is critical to ensuring people have knowledge of available services, the reason those services are critical to their health, and options to access those services based on their unique circumstances. With both stakeholders beating the same drum, progress can be made quickly.

Given the impact of social determinants of health (SDOH), should healthcare providers take a more active role in addressing these, or other agencies? 

While communicating with patients is critically important, what is truly required to address inequalities is helping patients take medical  actions – like regular PCP visits, monitoring A1C and accepting health coaching – that are necessary to maximise their health, along with non-medical actions –like availing themselves of community resources that address homelessness, food insecurity and employment services. 

The most progressive providers and payers have or are putting in place programs to address these non-medical issues.  In addition, non-medical tools such as transportation services can certainly help drive the effectiveness of medical services. 

How important is it to educate patients about their health and how can this be done? 

Education is a social determinant of health and a key lever to be used to drive health equity.  Patients who do not understand their medical conditions or the consequences of non-compliance with their treatment plans are prone to poor outcomes. 

For health plans, understanding member needs is one of the biggest drivers of quality care. A continuous cycle of engagement through feedback and appropriate responses will provide health plans with an opportunity to uncover, discuss, and resolve problems faster. 

Improving member outreach and engagement can be made easier with a programmatic approach involving four stages of intentional outreach: Getting to know your members, educating members, seeking feedback from members and gaining member loyalty. Each stage not only contributes to a better member experience but also to improved outcomes and higher satisfaction scores.

Now that the issue has come to the fore, what do you think things will look like in 5 years or so?

I predict that health plans that get member engagement, education and equity right will achieve better health and greater value, faster. Those who get it wrong or delay will suffer the consequences of competitive disadvantage and pay a larger share of the rising costs associated with health inequity.

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