May 17, 2020

Obesity figures are rising in Canada

Global healthcare
Global healthcare
Catherine Sturman
2 min
Delivering high patient outcomes across the US and Canada, Renew Bariatrics works with patients who seek alternatives to rising healthcare costs.

Risin...

Delivering high patient outcomes across the US and Canada, Renew Bariatrics works with patients who seek alternatives to rising healthcare costs.

Rising obesity figures in the country has led to a sharp rise in bariatric surgeries, where patients can wait up to five years for treatment, but is only available in nine provinces in Canada.

Renew Bariatrics has consequently released an infographic, detailing how obesity levels are rising in country.

The Canadian Obesity Network has stated that there is insufficient support in providing essential treatment, leading these figures to continually rise.

Over 1.5 million Canadians suffer with rising obesity levels, with one in three children under this umbrella. This impacts on individual health, increases healthcare costs across the board, and leads to 61-74% of diabetes type 2 causes.

In 2014, 14,222,521 Canadian’s (54% of the population) over 18 has been self-reported as overweight, according to the study, which is an increase of over 15% since 2003.

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The surprising statistic has led the Government of Canada’s ambition and investment of $3.1 million to tackle this issue, and encourage families to look at their current lifestyle, with the aim to introduce physical activity for increased physical and mental wellbeing, as well as everyday routines and eating plans. The rise of fast food, especially which caters to young children is startling and an increased concern for parents.

With an overall population of 36,664,582 and rising, Canada houses only 40 Canadian physicians who have formal training to address weight management, according to the study.

With limited availability and soaring healthcare costs, essential treatment is placed out of reach for ordinary families. Additionally, access to medication is limited, with only two anti-obesity drugs which are available in the region, which are not covered by current healthcare plans across the board.

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Jul 23, 2021

Advances in health "must ensure self-sovereign identity"

COVID19
covid19vaccine
digitalhealthcare
patientdata
3 min
https://tentoas.com/
As plans to introduce vaccine passports are announced, CEO of Tento Mark Shaw explains that individuals must retain control of their personal data

The UK government has announced that from September onwards COVID-19 vaccine passports will be necessary to gain entry into places with large crowds, such as nightclubs. 

This has reignited the debate between those who believe having proof of vaccinations will enable people to gather in public places and travel safely, and those who view the digital certificates as an attack on personal freedom. 

The arguments have increased in intensity since the recent announcement to drop COVID-19 restrictions in England, in a move to reopen the economy that has attracted fierce criticism both domestically and overseas. 

Cross-party ministers are set to defy the government’s latest plans to introduce vaccine passports over civil liberties concerns. A number of MPs have already signed the Big Brother Watch declaration against “Covid status certification to deny individuals access to general services, businesses or jobs” in recent months. 

However Mark Shaw, CEO of Tento Applied Sciences, says the Big Brother Watch campaign is based on false assumptions. “Big Brother Watch puts forward a compelling argument based around civil liberties, but some of the assumptions they make are simply incorrect” he says. 

“For example, the BBW campaign claims that all Covid passes are discriminatory, counterproductive and would lead to British citizens having to share personal health information with anyone in authority, from bouncers to bosses. However, there are already privacy-first digital wallets that give individuals the freedom to store and share anonymised medical documents, work credentials and other types of documentation quickly, simply, and securely.

“I wholeheartedly agree that individuals should not be required to share their own personal health information with unknown third parties or with anyone in authority who demands it" Shaw adds. "But I strongly disagree with the suggestion that ‘events and businesses are either safe to open for everyone, or no one’. It creates a false dichotomy that either everyone is safe, or nobody is safe. If employers or event organisers don’t take action to properly manage workplace or venue safety, then they risk curtailing the safety and freedom of movement for the majority." 

The subject of personal health data is under scrutiny in the UK at the moment, following controversial plans for the NHS to share patient data with third parties. These have been put on hold following public criticism. 

Meanwhile a new report has found that the majority of the British public is willing to embrace digital healthcare tools  such as apps and digital therapies prescribed by a trusted healthcare professional. 
Shaw adds: “The vital point to make is this: innovations in health technology must ensure self-sovereign identity. This means the data held about an individual is owned by the individual and stored on their device. And, in the case of medical data, that data can be delivered from healthcare professionals to the device in an encrypted format, and the user chooses how they share their information."

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