May 17, 2020

The UAE and the US extend their partnership with new stroke initiative

healthcare services
Catherine Sturman
3 min
CT scan (stroke) - Getty Images
The UAE has contributed $50 million towards the development of a new institute surrounding stroke research and development. It is part of a long-standin...

The UAE has contributed $50 million towards the development of a new institute surrounding stroke research and development. It is part of a long-standing partnership between Washington and the UAE, and will enable the Sheikh Khalifa Stroke Institute to open in the spring.

Named after UAE President, Sheikh Khalifa, the institute will focus on enhancing its service offering within stroke treatment, where one will focus on detection and diagnosis, and the other on treatment and rehabilitation, the Gulf News reports.

The $50 million grant has been regarded as one of the largest placed towards a stroke-based initiative, and will cater towards the growing number of stroke cases in both countries. In the UAE, it has been found that up to 10,000 strokes occur per year in citizens aged under 50. This number is significantly higher in the US, where it has been noted that strokes numbers have reached near to 800,000 cases per annum.

“We are grateful for the UAE’s gift, which enables us to leverage our considerable strengths in neurology, physical medicine and rehabilitation in combination with our expertise in biomedical engineering and patient safety to develop new tools for stroke diagnosis, treatment and recovery,” commented Paul Rothman, MD, Dean of the Medical Faculty and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

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“These efforts will improve the health of millions of people in Baltimore, the UAE and around the world, with the added benefit of bringing down health care costs.”

The middle east is placing significant investment in its bid to become one of the top places for patient care, and is building strong partnerships with new and existing partners in order to achieve its goals. Since the 1970s, the growth of public and private hospitals has reached record levels, where the country has built a diverse portfolio and is renowned for specialising in IVF and fertility treatment.

“I think we are at a pivotal point in stroke care where we now have the tools, technology and drugs to apply to the right patients at the right time,” McArthur said. “Some of the barriers to delivering care we are still trying to figure out,” said Justin McArthur, Director of the new institute.

“This new institute will not only generate better outcomes for stroke patients in the UAE and the US but will also strengthen opportunities for collaboration between UAE and US scientists and researchers,” noted Yousuf Mana’a Saeed Al Otaiba, UAE Ambassador to the US.

“We are grateful to Johns Hopkins for their continued leadership in patient-centred medicine and are proud of our long-standing partnership.”

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Jul 29, 2021

A third of UK patients prefer mobile apps to doctor visits

telehealth
digitalhealthcare
COVID19
mobileapps
2 min
A new survey by Mobiquity has found that 33% of UK patients would rather have a virtual consultation via a mobile app than visit the doctor in person

 A third of UK patients prefer using mobile healthcare applications to having face-to-face consultations, a new report has found. 

The research, commissioned by Mobiquity and conducted by Censuswide, surveyed 100 doctors  and 1,003 patients in the UK during COVID-19 to understand their experiences with digital healthcare technology and its impact on patient care.

It found that as a result of COVID-19, 33% of patients would rather use a mobile app than visit the doctor. 

Additionally over a third of doctors said that using mobile healthcare applications made it easier to prescribe the right treatment for patients remotely. However respondents cited technical issues and privacy concerns as barriers to using mobile healthcare apps. 

The survey's other findings include: 
 * 56% of UK patients plan to use mobile healthcare applications in the future after using them during COVID-19. 
 * 71% of doctors plan to adopt mobile healthcare applications in the future
 *52% of doctors experienced technical issues, with device compatibility problems being the most frequently reported technical issue
 *28% of patients cited privacy concerns when using mobile healthcare applications during COVID-19

Commenting on the report, Teun Schutte, Managing Consultant at Mobiquity said that the COVID-19 pandemic had been transformational for digital healthcare. "The pandemic has shown the importance of digital health solutions and the need for increased adoption in the future, while at the same time highlighting the benefits around ease of access to care for patients and lower costs for healthcare providers.

“The challenge that exists, however, is how to solve frictions in the delivery of mobile healthcare applications and other types of digital health in the future. Our research highlighted the main barriers to adoption for patients and practitioners, and the areas we need to optimise to ensure digital innovation is scaled successfully to improve patient outcomes. Indeed, technical issues and privacy concerns need to be solved by aligning stakeholder concerns before digital health products are launched" he added. 

“By aligning the digital innovation process and creating a blueprint for scaling the next generation of digital health technologies, as an industry we can scale digital health products or services across disease areas, and across hospitals, markets and regions, ensuring that patients receive personalised, quality care through digital health technologies.”

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