Feb 11, 2014

More and more women are suiting-up in surgical careers

Admin
3 min
More and More Women are Suiting-Up in Surgical Careers.jpg
Written by John McMa...

Written by John McMalcolm

 

In the past, doctors were mostly men and nurses were mostly women.

Soon, more women began to pursue careers as physicians, and they are now closing the gender gap among surgeons. Although the number of female surgeons has increased over the years, there may still be certain obstacles that are preventing them from achieving the highest levels of success in this still male-dominated field.

Here is a look at how women are faring in the field of surgery.

More Women Pursuing Careers in Surgery

Surgery has long been regarded as the last bastion of exclusively-male medicine.

This has changed significantly in recent years as a growing percentage of women who graduate from medical schools are opting to enter the surgical field. Now, women account for over 35 percent of all general surgical trainees in the United States, and they are also proving that they have the potential to excel in the field.

According to Dr. Julie A. Freischlag, chair of Johns Hopkins Hospital's department of surgery, 11 out of 15 of the top candidates for Hopkins' general surgery training program in 2013 were women.

Women Taking Leadership Roles in Surgery

Dr. Freischlag was the first female chair of the surgical department at Johns Hopkins Hospital and the first woman to be elected president of the Society for Vascular Surgery.

She belongs to a small but growing group of women who are assuming leadership positions in the field of surgery. In 2005, women made up 16.3 percent of the members of surgical faculty in U.S. medical schools, up from 12.6 percent in 2000.

Many hospitals, especially those that are attached to medical schools, are realizing the importance of recruiting high-profile women surgeons. Such women can serve as an inspiration for other women who are contemplating to enter the surgical field.

Challenges Faced by Women in the Surgical Field

Although women are increasingly making their mark in the field of surgery, very few of them have managed to move into leadership positions.

Some women surgeons believe that gender discrimination still exists in the field. Certain surgical specialties, such as neurological surgery and orthopedic surgery, remain very male-dominated, with men accounting for about 95 percent of all practicing surgeons.

General surgeon Dr. Dana Fugelso said that her chief surgeon refused to restore her operating room time after she returned from maternity leave, which she believes was a form of subtle bias.

According to her, women surgeons generally lack the opportunity to advance to higher positions in the surgical field.

Other women said that they are expected to behave nicer than male surgeons. If they want an operation to be performed a certain way, they may find themselves being labeled as domineering and pushy. On the other hand, male surgeons who do the same thing are often credited with being committed to excellence.

As more and more women decide to become surgeons, there will come a time when surgery is no longer a male-dominated field.

 

 

About the Author

John McMalcolm is a freelance writer who writes on a wide range of subjects, from women divorce to career selection.

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Jun 21, 2021

Dubai's new smart neuro spinal hospital: need to know

Robotics
smarthospitals
Cancer
Neurology
2 min
The brand new Neuro Spinal Hospital and Radiosurgery Centre has opened in Dubai. We take a look at what this smart hospital offers. 

We take a look at Dubai's new smart hospital. 

What: The Neuro Spinal Hospital and Radiosurgery Centre is a new hospital featuring state-of-the-art technology for spinal, neurosurgical, neurological, orthopaedic, radiosurgery and cancer treatments. The 700 million AED hospital, (equivalent to £138 million), has 114 beds, smart patient rooms, and green spaces for patient rehabilitation, and is four times the capacity of its former premises in Jumeirah.   It is also the UAE’s first hospital to have surgical robots. 

Where: The hospital is located in the Dubai Science Park. Founded in 2005,  Dubai Science Park is home to more than 350 companies from multinational corporations in life sciences, biotechnology and research; over 4,000 people work here each day. 

Who: The UAE's Neuro Spinal Hospital and Radiosurgery Centre was first established in Jumeirah in 2002 by Dr. Abdul Karim Msaddi, as the first as the first "super-specialty" neuroscience hospital. 

Why: With advanced diagnosis and robotics, the hospital will provide care across neuroscience, spine, orthopaedics and oncology for people residing in the UAE, as well as international patients.  

Prof. Abdul Karim Msaddi, Chairman and Medical Director of the hospital, said: “We are proud to bring world-class healthcare services to Dubai and believe our  next-generation hospital will be a game-changer for the emirate’s and the region’s medical industry.

"It will not only significantly increase the availability of specialist neuroscience and radiosurgery treatments and provide better patient care but help attract and develop local and international talent. Investing in the new centre represents our continued faith in the resilience of the region’s economy, as well as a testament to our ongoing drive towards healthcare innovation in the UAE.”

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