May 17, 2020

UK to boost dementia research funding to £66m by 2015

dementia
research
funding
UK
Admin
3 min
David Cameron has pledged £66m to dementia research
The UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, has pledged to more than double the funding available for dementia research by 2015. It is hoped an investment of...

The UK Prime Minister, David Cameron, has pledged to more than double the funding available for dementia research by 2015.

It is hoped an investment of £66 million will help the UK to become a world-leader in that particular field of research.

The announcement comes just days after a study carried out by the Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters found the UK is currently second in the world in dementia research.

Cameron has described dementia as a national “crisis” and said it is his “personal priority” to enhance the understanding of the disease and improve its diagnosis.

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It is thought the £66 million worth of funding, which has increased from £26.6 million in 2010, will go towards researching cures and treatments for the condition.

The extra cash will also help to ensure local health and social services have the resources available to care for dementia patients.

“One of the greatest challenges of our time is what I'd call the quiet crisis, one that steals lives and tears at the hearts of families, but that relative to its impact is hardly acknowledged,” Cameron is expected to say in a speech later today.

“Dementia is simply a terrible disease. And it is a scandal that we as a country haven't kept pace with it.

“The level of diagnosis, understanding and awareness of dementia is shockingly low. It is as though we've been in collective denial,” he will add.

“So my argument today is that we've got to treat this like the national crisis it is. We need an all-out fightback against this disease, one that cuts across society.”

The Prime Minister will continue: “We did it with cancer in the 70s. With HIV in the 80s and 90s. We fought the stigma, stepped up to the challenge and made massive in-roads into fighting these killers.

“Now we've got to do the same with dementia. This is a personal priority of mine, and it's got an ambition to match.

“That ambition - nothing less than for Britain to be a world leader in dementia research and care.”

This is a goal that is definitely achievable for the UK, particularly after the promising findings of the Thomson Reuters study.

The results from the analysis reveal the UK published more research on dementia than any other country except the United States and ranks second in the world after Sweden in citation impact, which is the number of times UK research is referenced in dementia studies around the globe.

Despite its high performance and influence, dementia research capacity in the UK is low when compared to cancer, stroke and heart disease.

For every dementia research scientist there are six who work on cancer.

“Research output and citation impact in scientific literature is an ideal way to measure the quality and capacity of dementia research,” said Karen Gurney, manager of bibliometric reporting at Thomson Reuters and analyst of this report.

“This project illuminated an interesting dementia-research landscape in the UK, where this region is clearly playing an influential role despite its size.”

The research study was commissioned by the UK’s leading dementia research charity, Alzheimer’s Research UK, in an effort to raise awareness and increase investment for the underfunded field.

“The data provided by Thomson Reuters have been extremely valuable in allowing Alzheimer’s Research UK to uncover the facts about dementia research output and quality in the UK,” said Simon Ridley, head of research at Alzheimer’s Research UK.

“We wanted to dig deep into the issue of UK research capacity in this field. The work carried out by Thomson Reuters enabled us to do this and make a strong case for more investment in dementia research.”

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Jun 22, 2021

Bachem turns 50 - a timeline

pharma
supplychain
peptides
medication
3 min
As Bachem turns 50, we take a look at the company's history

Bachem, a supplier to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies worldwide, is celebrating its 50th anniversary this month. We take a look at the Swiss company's history.  

1971 - beginnings

Bachem is founded by entrepreneur Peter Grogg in Liestal, a small town near Basel in Switzerland. Grogg started the firm with just two employees, and with a focus on peptide synthesis - peptides are composed of amino acids that have a variety of functions treating health conditions such as cancer and diabetes. 

1977 - 1981 - early growth

Bachem moves its headquarters to the Swiss town of Bubendorf, with eight employees. In 1978 the company produces peptides for use in medicines for the first time. In 1981 production capacity triples and the workforce grows to 150. 

 1987 - 1996 - worldwide expansion

The company expands into the US with Bachem Bioscience, Inc. in Philadelphia. To strengthen its presence in Europe, Bachem opens sales and marketing centres in Germany in 1988. 

Further sales centres open in France in 1993. By 1995 the company employs 190 people. In 1996 it acquires the second largest manufacturer of peptides in the world and forms Bachem California with a site in Torrance. 

 1998 - 2003 - Bachem goes public

Bachem company goes public and lists shares on the Swiss Stock Exchange. Further acquisitions include Peninsula Laboratories, Inc, based in California, and  Sochinaz SA, a Swiss-based manufacturer of active pharmaceutical ingredients.  By 2001, the company has 500 employees and sales reach 141 million CHF.

In 2003 the organisation is given a new legal holding structure to support its continued growth, which remains in place to this day. 

2007 - 2013 - acquisitions

Bachem acquires a brand by Merck Biosciences for ready-to-use clinical trial materials and related services. 

In 2013, together with GlyTech, Inc. Bachem announces the development of a new amino acid that can help to treat multiple sclerosis, with a world market of more than $4 billion. 

In 2015 it acquires the American Peptide Company (APC), which becomes integrated into Bachem Americas. 

2016 - 2019 - a global leader

In 2016 the group opens a new building dedicated to R&D projects and small series production in Bubendorf. With a total of 1,022 employees, the workforce exceeds the 1,000 mark for the first time in the company’s history. Sales are over the 200 million mark for the first time at 236.5 million CHF.
Bachem expands into Asia with the establishment of a new company in Tokyo called Bachem Japan K.K. 

By 2019 Bachem has a growing oligonucleotide portfolio - these are DNA molecules used in genetic testing, research, and forensics. It is hoped this will become a significant product range in the future. 

2020 - COVID-19

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Bachem secures its supply of active ingredients, and even increases it in critical areas. Sales exceed the 400 million Swiss franc mark for the first time, and  272 new employees are hired.  

2021 - a milestone anniversary

Bachem celebrates its 50th anniversary and position as a global leader in the manufacture of peptides. While it  remains headquartered in Bubendorf, the company employs 1,500 people at six locations worldwide. In the next five years there are  plans to continue expanding. 

Commemorating the company's anniversary, Kuno Sommer, Chairman of the Board of Directors, said: "Bachem's exceptional success story from a small laboratory to a global market leader is closely linked to Peter Grogg's values, and has been shaped by innovation, consistent quality and cost awareness, as well as by entrepreneurial vision."

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