Oct 26, 2020

Wearable device could treat chronic migraine

wearable tech
chronic migraine
medical device
digital therapeutics
Leila Hawkins
2 min
Wearable device could treat chronic migraine
Nerivio® was named one of TIME's best inventions for 2019...

Theranica, a a digital therapeutics company that develops products for migraines and other pain conditions has developed Nerivio® to treat acute chronic migraines in people aged 18 years and over. 

Controlled by a smartphone app, the device uses Remote Electrical Neuromodulation (REN) to activate a mechanism in the brain that can treat pain and accompanying migraine symptoms. Nerivio is one of TIME magazine's best inventions of 2019.  

According to the Migraine Research Foundation, more than 4 million adults in the US experience chronic migraines , with at least 15 migraine days per month. While most medication for migraines has limited monthly usage before it stops being effective, Nerivio has been shown in clinical trials to be effective without risks of medication overuse. As a result it's received clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this expanded treatment indication. 

Prof. Stephen Silberstein MD, the director of the Headache Center at the Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia and a member of Theranica’s Medical Advisory Board explains: “The updated Nerivio indication is an important development for patients with chronic migraine”. 

"When chronic patients find an effective treatment, they must limit its use every month to avoid loss of effectiveness and a risk of medication overuse headache. Availability of an additional treatment option such as Nerivio provides an important additional tool to address this patient population.”

He added: “With over one thousand treatments by 130 chronic migraine patients across two open-label studies with Nerivio, the data is clinically relevant.”

Nancy Harris Bonk, a migraine patient advocate and Chief Operating Officer of Chronic Migraine Awareness, Inc, commented: “It is so important for people living with chronic migraine to now have access to this effective non-pharmacological therapy."

“With migraine attacks occurring so frequently, we, people with chronic migraine, need to be mindful of overusing medications, and identify the right individual balance of therapies that allows us to carry on with our daily routines.”

Nerivio can currently be obtained by prescription and is delivered directly to patients' homes. Each Nerivio is good for 12 treatments, after which it can be recycled, and the prescription refilled with a new dispensed device. 

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Jun 17, 2021

Dexcom: changing the lives of people with type 1 diabetes

diabetes
glucosemonitoring
type1diabetes
insulin
3 min
British actress Nina Wadia OBE tells us how her son's life has changed since using glucose monitoring system Dexcom

It is estimated that 9.3% of adults around the world are living with type 1 diabetes, which amounts to a total of 463 million people. A further 1.1 million children and adolescents under the age of 20 are living with the condition. 

Unlike the more prevalent type 2 diabetes, where the body still produces insulin and symptoms develop slowly, people with type 1 diabetes need regular insulin injections or pumps, and must monitor their sugar levels frequently. 

In recent years a number of remote glucose monitoring systems have become available that patients can use at home. These work with a sensor, usually placed under the skin, that measures glucose levels every few minutes. This information is then transmitted wirelessly to a device like a smartphone or tablet, which can then be shared with their clinician. 

British actress Nina Wadia's son Aidan, 14, has type 1 diabetes, and has been managing his condition using Dexcom, a glucose monitoring system used by patients all over the world. Here Wadia explains how Dexcom has improved their lives. 

As a parent of someone with type 1 diabetes, what is your day-to-day life like?
Being able to take a breath, think and pivot constantly without getting frustrated becomes an essential mindset because sometimes it feels like each day is determined to be different from the day before. Whatever worked yesterday is going to misfire today. 

Which areas of yours and Aidan’s life are most impacted by diabetes? 
The one thing that you have to fight hard to reclaim is spontaneity, especially when it comes to food and exercise. It’s only when this is taken do you realise how essential each one is. You can be flexible and there are no real limits, but only in the sense that a great athlete can be flexible without limits because they’ve trained super hard to be that way. So we’ve all had to become athletes when it comes to being spontaneous.

How has Dexcom helped you and Aidan? 
Dexcom has brought future science fiction to real life today. The continuous glucose monitoring system is tiny, sits discreetly on his body and gives him a ten-day breather between sensor changes, so it's goodbye finger-pricking seven times daily. 

Dexcom is totally active at a grass roots level and for Diabetes Awareness has pledged to donate £2,000 if #DexcomDiabetesStories and/or #DexcomWarriorStories is shared 200 times! I’ll be sharing more on social media and would love to hear how other families are winning their fights.

Maybe most importantly Dexcom is trying to introduce a reimbursement programme for type 1 diabetes  patients which will give greater access to modern, life changing hi-tech. I want to spread the word on the importance of accessing it through this campaign. 

If you compared your life today with how it was before Aidan was using Dexcom, what has changed? 
It's always working, which lets him take his mind off diabetes for longer stretches. It also lets me get off his back. We both receive alerts so I no longer have to pester him by asking him what his number is, and especially importantly, I don’t have to wake him at night to prick his finger if I’m worried. Dexcom gave us back our sleep!

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