May 17, 2020

69% of healthcare providers plan to move more data to the cloud

Cloud
Digital health
Cloud
Digital health
Catherine Sturman
2 min
cloud tech healthcare (Getty Images)
Named to both the Inc. 5000 and Deloitte Technology Fast 500 lists of the fastest growing companies in the US, Netwrix Corporation, provider of a visibi...

Named to both the Inc. 5000 and Deloitte Technology Fast 500 lists of the fastest growing companies in the US, Netwrix Corporation, provider of a visibility platform for data security and risk mitigation in hybrid environments, has released its 2018 Netwrix Cloud Security: In-Depth Report for Healthcare.

The report reveals most healthcare providers store patient sensitive data in the cloud, yet only a few have all round visibility into who is accessing that data.

In January of 2018, The National Health Service (NHS), the largest healthcare provider in the UK, officially approved the use of US-based cloud providers to store patient data, the report states. The company found that 84% of healthcare organisations already store data in the cloud, but the NHS is the first state healthcare organisation to give the go-ahead.

Although the NHS' decision was driven by commonly cited cloud benefits, such as better data security and reduced operating costs, in reality, only 19% of organisations surveyed said their security improved after cloud adoption the report continues.

See also

Last year, malware infiltrations and cyber-attacks grew in the healthcare, space, with variants such as NotPetya and WannaCry. The WannaCry attack resulted in disruptions at 37% of NHS trusts and resulted in thousands spent in extra costs to cover cancelled appointments and repair the damage to all existing data platforms. 68% surveyed have therefore named the risk of unauthorised access to be a key concern, as well as 61%, who claimed the risk of malware infiltration to be a dominant factor.

Healthcare is also the only industry surveyed which therefore named data encryption as a top cloud security concern at 45%. Encrypting all healthcare data handled can double or triple a cloud bill, hence smaller organisations without government support, tending to refuse the use of cloud technology.

Despite this, healthcare organisations have named employees as a top risk to cloud security, with 55% of respondents saying that the human factor plays the most important role. Third parties, external actors and cloud providers are seen as less of a threat.

“This year shows positive dynamics in cloud adoption by healthcare providers, as more organisations are willing to move their sensitive data to the cloud, or already store it there. Yet the major security concerns remain the same: Most organisations perceive employees as the main threat to their systems and data, while lack of visibility across the IT environment makes it more difficult to deal with potential risks,” explained Michael Fimin, CEO and co-founder of Netwrix.

Share article

Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

Share article