May 17, 2020

Apple integrates US patient health records into its Health App

Apple
healthcare
Technology
Apple
Catherine Sturman
3 min
Apple (image supplied)
Technology giant Apple continually remains ahead of the curve – healthcare is no exception. To the delight of consumers, it has revealed its recent se...

Technology giant Apple continually remains ahead of the curve – healthcare is no exception. To the delight of consumers, it has revealed its recent service offering, where it has integrated patients’ medical records into its Health App as part of the iOS 11.3 beta. The data is encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode.

Collaborating with hospital providers and clinics across the US, the company has now enabled patients to see medical records from multiple providers within one core tech platform, covering allegies, conditions, immunisations, medications and more. Johns Hopkins Medicine, Cedars-Sinai, Penn Medicine, UC San Diego Health and many other participating hospitals and clinics are among the first to make this beta feature available to their patients.

Apple has also worked with the healthcare community to develop a consumer-friendly approach, creating Health Records based on FHIR (Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources), a standard process in transferring electronic medical records.

 “Our goal is to help consumers live a better day. We’ve worked closely with the health community to create an experience everyone has wanted for years — to view medical records easily and securely right on your iPhone,” commented Jeff Williams, Apple’s Chief Operating Officer.

“By empowering customers to see their overall health, we hope to help consumers better understand their health and help them lead healthier lives.”

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Apple’s ambition to make healthcare a seamless, positive experience for consumers is slowly coming into fruition.

“Putting the patient at the center of their care by enabling them to direct and control their own health records has been a focus for us at Cedars-Sinai for some time. We are thrilled to see Apple taking the lead in this space by enabling access for consumers to their medical information on their iPhones,” added Darren Dworkin, Chief Information Officer at Cedars-Sinai.

“Apple is uniquely positioned to help scale adoption because they have both a secure and trusted platform and have adopted the latest industry open standards at a time when the industry is well positioned to respond.”

In the coming months, more medical facilities will connect to Health Records offering their patients access to this feature.

Those who are concerned that Apple will gain access to personal, confidential data need not fear. Williams informed CNBC that “Apple doesn't see the data unless the consumer chooses to share it," providing further advantages for the healthcare sector to collaborate with technology companies to develop digital tools in alignment with consumer demand.

This will also further encourage health providers to undertake increased data-sharing and minimise potential risks within fragmented clinical documentation, particularly when a patient moves from public to private healthcare, and vice versa.

 

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Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

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