May 17, 2020

BlackBerry is set to build a new secure, global healthcare ecosystem  

Digital health
medical devices
medical devices
Digital health
Catherine Sturman
3 min
BlackBerry - Flickr (Enrique Dans)
BlackBerry Limitedhas announced its plans to transform the global delivery of patient care enabled by the Enterprise of Things (EoT) with the support of...

BlackBerry Limited has announced its plans to transform the global delivery of patient care enabled by the Enterprise of Things (EoT) with the support of its partners. By harnessing the company’s renowned carrier-grade network operation centre (NOC) to power a blockchain digital ledger, provided by ONEBIO, a secure global ecosystem for the storing and sharing of medical data, can be anonymised, will be created.

“We are applying our expertise in security, data privacy, and communication work in regulated industries such as automotive, financial services, and government to tackle one of the biggest challenges in the healthcare industry: leveraging healthcare endpoints to improve patient outcomes while ensuring security and data privacy,” said John Chen, Executive Chairman and CEO of BlackBerry.

By offering its new secure blockchain solution to the Global Commission, an organisation focused on ending the diagnostic odyssey for children with a rare disease, one of the company’s technology pilots will look at how Blackberry’s new solution could provide real-time, actionable analysis as the Commission seeks to use technology to shorten the time to diagnosis.   

Compliant with IEC 62304 safety-certification standards, BlackBerry’s new QNX OS for Medical 2.0 is a real-time operating system for the development of robotic surgical instruments, patient monitoring systems, infusion pumps, blood analysis systems, and other safety-critical products that must pass stringent regulatory approval.

With QNX OS for Medical 2.0, medical device manufacturers have the assurance of using trusted software field-proven in thousands of life-critical environments, including in FDA Class III medical devices.

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Additionally, The Mackenzie Innovation Institute (Mi2) is exploring security and connectivity between the BlackBerry Spark platform and its ‘smart’ healthcare technology vision. Mi2 helps drive innovation in healthcare through research, education and training while enhancing healthcare practices, treatments, service delivery models and more.

“By developing a deeper understanding and exploring how our ‘smart’ systems operate with BlackBerry Spark, we aim to uncover new ways to connect, protect and intuitively manage smart technologies in a hospital and positively impact high-quality patient care,” says Richard Tam, Chief Financial Officer of Mi2. “Together, we will focus on comprehensive security, patient privacy and intelligent connectivity, all the while achieving the vision of the Internet of Healthcare Things (IoHT).”

Mi² is a bridge between industry and healthcare for the implementation and evaluation of innovative and disruptive technologies, process redesign, and practice changes in real-time healthcare environments in order to create sustainable value-added improvements in patient experience, quality and outcomes.

Not content with this, BlackBerry has also collaborated with the Melanoma Institute Australia (MIA). Pioneering the prevention and cure of melanoma through world-class research, treatment and education programmes, the company has selected BlackBerry to enable researchers to securely share critical research data and patient records in a heavily regulated environment. 

Approved contributors in the network, such as scientists and doctors at different hospitals, can use BlackBerry Workspaces to save and share data from medical histories and clinical trials to assess the effectiveness of treatments and interventions. The easy-to-use, encrypted collaboration solution will enable researchers to share timely clinical data, reduce the risk of data leakage, and accelerate research efforts.

Ernie White, Chief Information Officer of Melanoma Institute of Australia commented, “Our priority is to advance the treatment of melanoma, so any new technology must support the clinical journey for our clinicians, not interrupt it. As we continue to expand our research network, Melanoma Institute Australia is accelerating how our researchers can freely collaborate in a very regulated environment, while maintaining data integrity. BlackBerry Workspaces strikes that balance between security and ease-of-use, while helping to meet data compliance and our own digital transformation goals.” 

 

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Jul 27, 2021

 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds

NHS
carehomes
elderlycare
healthcare
2 min
 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds
NHS residential care homes provide better quality care than the private sector, a new report by Kepler Vision Technologies has found

A new survey has found that 60% of people with parents in NHS care homes believe the quality of care has improved, compared to just 49% of respondents with parents in private care facilities. 

The survey was conducted by Kepler Vision Technologies, an AI-driven company formed at the University of Amsterdam. It was carried out among UK adults with parents over the age of 75. 

Respondents cited more capable care staff and better monitoring systems as being the main reasons for improvement. 

However those who do not have parents in assisted living facilities had a different viewpoint - in this case only 35% of respondents believe that NHS facilities are improving, compared to 32% who believe it is only improving in the private sector. 

Only 18% of people whose parents live with them or independently believe care home staff are able to look after residents to a good standard.

Kepler Vision say this difference in opinion is due to perceived budget cuts and financial pressures, with 67% of people commenting that a lack of funding has had a negative effect on care in both NHS and private care facilities. 

Other key findings of the survey include: 
 * Out of those who say quality has declined in care homes, 69% say the NHS is dealing with budget cuts and increased financial pressure, while 65% also said that the private system is dealing with these pressures too
 * 55% said that they or their parent have money saved specifically to pay for their future care
 * 35% said the idea of their parent in a care home makes them feel frightened, although 32% say it makes them feel secure
 * 52% are worried about their parent catching COVID
 * 47%  are worried about their parent being lonely
 * 46% are concerned they could fall over alone

The announcement of this research follows the UK government's decision to delay presenting its social care budget till the autumn

Commenting on the research, Dr Harro Stokman, CEO of Kepler Vision Technologies said: “While it is good to see that people recognise the importance of staff and face-to-face interaction in elderly care, the huge gap in opinion between those with parents in care and those without shows that there are unfair negative perceptions around the residential care space. 

"More can and should be done by care homes to give people the confidence that their relatives will receive the very best care - by highlighting the excellent work of staff and how well they are able to monitor resident’s needs with easy-to-use technology.”

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