May 17, 2020

Breastfeeding can reduce BMI long-term

Breastfeeding
BMI
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Admin
4 min
Women who breastfeed have been found to stay slimmer for longer
Mothers can stay slimmer for longer if they breastfeed, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Obesity. The study, which wa...

Mothers can stay slimmer for longer if they breastfeed, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Obesity. The study, which was funded by Cancer Research and the Medical Research Council (MRC) found that women who breastfed their children have a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than those who did not.

740 thousand post-menopausal women participated in the UK trial, which found that long term weight was affected in both childbearing and breastfeeding women. The effects found, however, were slightly different for each group.

 

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The results displayed that a woman’s BMI increases according to how many children they have had. However, those who had breastfed have considerably lower average BMI no matter how many children they conceived.

Those who participated displayed a 1 percent decrease in their BMI with every six months they had breastfed. Other factors highly associated with obesity, such as smoking, exercise and social deprivation were not found to have any effect on women’s BMI.

The Director of the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at the University of Oxford and study co-author, Professor Dame Valerie Beral, told the press:

"A one percent reduction in BMI may seem small, but spread across the population of the UK that could mean about 10,000 fewer premature deaths per decade from obesity-related conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, and some cancers."

Dr Kirsty Bobrow, leading author of the paper, wants women to know how much breastfeeding not only benefits the babies, but also themselves, even 20 years after they give birth.

Director of the MRC/Chief Scientist Office Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, Professor Dame Macintyre, told Medical News Today:

"The obesity epidemic is one of the biggest challenges facing both high income and, increasingly, low and middle income countries. Rates of obesity are continuing to rise. Studies such as this one, which look at broad trends within a large population, can help us to develop effective strategies to prevent obesity and its related diseases."

 

Mothers can stay slimmer for longer if they breastfeed, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Obesity. The study, which was funded by Cancer Research and the Medical Research Council (MRC) found that women who breastfed their children have a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than those who did not.

740 thousand post-menopausal women participated in the UK trial, which found that long term weight was affected in both childbearing and breastfeeding women. The effects found, however, were slightly different for each group.

The results displayed that a woman’s BMI increases according to how many children they have had. However, those who had breastfed have considerably lower average BMI no matter how many children they conceived.

Those who participated displayed a 1 percent decrease in their BMI with every six months they had breastfed. Other factors highly associated with obesity, such as smoking, exercise and social deprivation were not found to have any effect on women’s BMI.

The Director of the Cancer Epidemiology Unit at the University of Oxford and study co-author, Professor Dame Valerie Beral, told the press:

" A one percent reduction in BMI may seem small, but spread across the population of the UK that could mean about 10,000 fewer premature deaths per decade from obesity-related conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, and some cancers."

 

Dr Kirsty Bobrow, leading author of the paper, wants women to know how much breastfeeding not only benefits the babies, but also themselves, even 20 years after they give birth.

Director of the MRC/Chief Scientist Office Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, Professor Dame Macintyre, told Medical News Today:

"The obesity epidemic is one of the biggest challenges facing both high income and, increasingly, low and middle income countries. Rates of obesity are continuing to rise. Studies such as this one, which look at broad trends within a large population, can help us to develop effective strategies to prevent obesity and its related diseases."

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Jun 24, 2021

Jvion launches AI-powered map to tackle mental health crisis

AI
mentalhealth
dataanalytics
PredictiveAnalytics
2 min
Jvion's new interactive map uses AI to predict areas most vulnerable to poor mental health

Clinical AI company Jvion has launched an interactive map  of the US that highlights areas that are most vulnerable to poor mental health. 

The Behavioral Health Vulnerability Map uses Jvion's AI CORE™ software to analyse public data on social determinants of health (SDOH)  and determine the vulnerability of every US Census block group. 

Vulnerability refers to the likelihood that residents will experience issues like self-harm, suicide attempts or overdoses. The map also identifies the most influential social determinants in each region, to show the social and environmental conditions that contribute to mental illness. 

As an example, the map shows that Harrison County in Mississippi has a 50% higher suicide rate than the rest of the state. It also shows a high percentage of individuals in the armed forces at a time when active duty suicides are at a six-year high, along with a high prevalence of coronary artery disease, arthritis, and COPD, all chronic illnesses that are linked to a higher suicide risk.  

The map also shows Harrison County has a high percentage of Vietnamese Americans, who studies suggest have high rates of depression and may be less likely to seek help from mental health professionals. 

The map was built using the same data and analytics that Jvion used to create the COVID Community Vulnerability Map, which was launched towards the start of the pandemic. 

With this new map, Jvion is aiming to tackle the growing mental health crisis in the US. “At a time when so many Americans are struggling with their mental health, we’re proud to offer a tool that can help direct treatment resources to the communities that need it most,” said Dr John Showalter, MD, Jvion’s chief product officer, who led the development of the map. 

“For too long, the healthcare industry has struggled to address social determinants of health, particularly in the context of behavioural health. Our hope is that by surfacing the social and environmental vulnerabilities of America’s communities, we can better coordinate our response to the underlying conditions that impact the health and wellbeing of people everywhere.” 

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