May 17, 2020

Case Western Reserve University partners with Microsoft in new quantum computing health project

USA
Microsoft
Digital health
health services
Catherine Sturman
2 min
quantum computing (Getty Images)
In a recent blog, Microsoft’s Quantum division has announced its partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) to further improve patient ca...

In a recent blog, Microsoft’s Quantum division has announced its partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) to further improve patient care.

Harnessing Microsoft’s quantum computing capabilities. CWRU will work to further develop existing ways to detect and diagnose cancerous tumours.

Radiology Professor Mark Griswold and his team will work with experts at Microsoft Quantum throughout the project, Cleveland Business has reported.  

Working on revolutionising magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the University has developed magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

“Where typical MRI machines use a series of fixed acquisitions to establish a diagnosis, magnetic resonance fingerprinting uses a constantly varying sequence of pulses, resulting in a single, unified exam,” explained Todd Holmdahl, Corporate Vice President at Microsoft Quantum.

“The final quantitative maps are generated by comparing the response against a lookup table, resulting in a more rapid and repeatable characterisation of tissues.”

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Producing higher-quality imaging capabilities, the approach houses a multitude of advantages over traditional MRI tools.  Through the partnership, Microsoft will support CWRU’s aim to utilise quantum-inspired algorithms, which will lead to a quicker, more accurate diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, and in turn, provide positive patient experiences.

“Once the scan is complete, Microsoft HoloLens will be used for a 3D, holographic model of the results,” Holmdahl added.

“We see incredible possibilities to not only improve the quality of healthcare and medical research, but also demonstrate how quantum computing, machine learning, and mixed reality can be combined to turn challenges of the past into solutions of the future.”

"We are thrilled to partner with Microsoft again on another project that expands our understanding of what technology can make possible," commented Griswold.

"Quantum computing provides an opportunity to find the truly best way to scan patients. We are so excited to explore how far we can push these new quantum and quantum-inspired methods beyond traditional computer algorithms."

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Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

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