May 17, 2020

Case Western Reserve University partners with Microsoft in new quantum computing health project

USA
Microsoft
Digital health
health services
Catherine Sturman
2 min
quantum computing (Getty Images)
In a recent blog, Microsoft’s Quantum division has announced its partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) to further improve patient ca...

In a recent blog, Microsoft’s Quantum division has announced its partnership with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) to further improve patient care.

Harnessing Microsoft’s quantum computing capabilities. CWRU will work to further develop existing ways to detect and diagnose cancerous tumours.

Radiology Professor Mark Griswold and his team will work with experts at Microsoft Quantum throughout the project, Cleveland Business has reported.  

Working on revolutionising magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the University has developed magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

“Where typical MRI machines use a series of fixed acquisitions to establish a diagnosis, magnetic resonance fingerprinting uses a constantly varying sequence of pulses, resulting in a single, unified exam,” explained Todd Holmdahl, Corporate Vice President at Microsoft Quantum.

“The final quantitative maps are generated by comparing the response against a lookup table, resulting in a more rapid and repeatable characterisation of tissues.”

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Producing higher-quality imaging capabilities, the approach houses a multitude of advantages over traditional MRI tools.  Through the partnership, Microsoft will support CWRU’s aim to utilise quantum-inspired algorithms, which will lead to a quicker, more accurate diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, and in turn, provide positive patient experiences.

“Once the scan is complete, Microsoft HoloLens will be used for a 3D, holographic model of the results,” Holmdahl added.

“We see incredible possibilities to not only improve the quality of healthcare and medical research, but also demonstrate how quantum computing, machine learning, and mixed reality can be combined to turn challenges of the past into solutions of the future.”

"We are thrilled to partner with Microsoft again on another project that expands our understanding of what technology can make possible," commented Griswold.

"Quantum computing provides an opportunity to find the truly best way to scan patients. We are so excited to explore how far we can push these new quantum and quantum-inspired methods beyond traditional computer algorithms."

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Jul 27, 2021

 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds

NHS
carehomes
elderlycare
healthcare
2 min
 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds
NHS residential care homes provide better quality care than the private sector, a new report by Kepler Vision Technologies has found

A new survey has found that 60% of people with parents in NHS care homes believe the quality of care has improved, compared to just 49% of respondents with parents in private care facilities. 

The survey was conducted by Kepler Vision Technologies, an AI-driven company formed at the University of Amsterdam. It was carried out among UK adults with parents over the age of 75. 

Respondents cited more capable care staff and better monitoring systems as being the main reasons for improvement. 

However those who do not have parents in assisted living facilities had a different viewpoint - in this case only 35% of respondents believe that NHS facilities are improving, compared to 32% who believe it is only improving in the private sector. 

Only 18% of people whose parents live with them or independently believe care home staff are able to look after residents to a good standard.

Kepler Vision say this difference in opinion is due to perceived budget cuts and financial pressures, with 67% of people commenting that a lack of funding has had a negative effect on care in both NHS and private care facilities. 

Other key findings of the survey include: 
 * Out of those who say quality has declined in care homes, 69% say the NHS is dealing with budget cuts and increased financial pressure, while 65% also said that the private system is dealing with these pressures too
 * 55% said that they or their parent have money saved specifically to pay for their future care
 * 35% said the idea of their parent in a care home makes them feel frightened, although 32% say it makes them feel secure
 * 52% are worried about their parent catching COVID
 * 47%  are worried about their parent being lonely
 * 46% are concerned they could fall over alone

The announcement of this research follows the UK government's decision to delay presenting its social care budget till the autumn

Commenting on the research, Dr Harro Stokman, CEO of Kepler Vision Technologies said: “While it is good to see that people recognise the importance of staff and face-to-face interaction in elderly care, the huge gap in opinion between those with parents in care and those without shows that there are unfair negative perceptions around the residential care space. 

"More can and should be done by care homes to give people the confidence that their relatives will receive the very best care - by highlighting the excellent work of staff and how well they are able to monitor resident’s needs with easy-to-use technology.”

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