May 17, 2020

Deep learning in healthcare: Deep 6 AI and MIT demo uses

medical devices
Health technology
William Smith
2 min
Deep learning has the potential to change our lives. Nowhere is this more evident than in the healthcare sector
The subset of AI known as deep learning, which uses artificial neural networks to teach machines, has myriad uses. From image recognition used in autono...

The subset of AI known as deep learning, which uses artificial neural networks to teach machines, has myriad uses. From image recognition used in autonomous vehicles to the natural language processing used to turn human speech into machine instructions, the technology has the potential to change our lives. Nowhere is this more evident than in the healthcare sector.

A newly released paper in the journal Cell outlines the discovery of a powerful antibiotic known as Halicin via the deployment of deep learning. The scientists involved trained a neural network to predict molecules with “antibacterial activity”, eventually finding Halicin, which differs in structure from conventional antibiotics. A further eight antibacterial compounds were also discovered. 

A separate but related development comes from Deep 6 AI, a member of the Nvidia Inception accelerator program for AI startups, making use of Nvidia’s GPUs, which are frequently employed for machine learning owing to their highly parallel structure.

Deep 6 AI specifically are involved in finding new methods of screening patients for clinical trials as medicine becomes increasingly targeted. “In the age of precision medicine, clinical trial criteria are getting more challenging,” CEO Wout Brusselaers said. “When developing a drug that is targeting patients with a rare genetic mutation, you have to be able to find those specific patients.”

Deep 6’s method involves processing medical records to identify and then label whatever criteria are relevant for the trial. Using natural language processing to gather relevant mentions, Deep 6 can also analyse unstructured data for additional information before creating a graph for doctors to peruse. The process has led to over 100,000 matches so far.

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Jul 27, 2021

 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds

NHS
carehomes
elderlycare
healthcare
2 min
 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds
NHS residential care homes provide better quality care than the private sector, a new report by Kepler Vision Technologies has found

A new survey has found that 60% of people with parents in NHS care homes believe the quality of care has improved, compared to just 49% of respondents with parents in private care facilities. 

The survey was conducted by Kepler Vision Technologies, an AI-driven company formed at the University of Amsterdam. It was carried out among UK adults with parents over the age of 75. 

Respondents cited more capable care staff and better monitoring systems as being the main reasons for improvement. 

However those who do not have parents in assisted living facilities had a different viewpoint - in this case only 35% of respondents believe that NHS facilities are improving, compared to 32% who believe it is only improving in the private sector. 

Only 18% of people whose parents live with them or independently believe care home staff are able to look after residents to a good standard.

Kepler Vision say this difference in opinion is due to perceived budget cuts and financial pressures, with 67% of people commenting that a lack of funding has had a negative effect on care in both NHS and private care facilities. 

Other key findings of the survey include: 
 * Out of those who say quality has declined in care homes, 69% say the NHS is dealing with budget cuts and increased financial pressure, while 65% also said that the private system is dealing with these pressures too
 * 55% said that they or their parent have money saved specifically to pay for their future care
 * 35% said the idea of their parent in a care home makes them feel frightened, although 32% say it makes them feel secure
 * 52% are worried about their parent catching COVID
 * 47%  are worried about their parent being lonely
 * 46% are concerned they could fall over alone

The announcement of this research follows the UK government's decision to delay presenting its social care budget till the autumn

Commenting on the research, Dr Harro Stokman, CEO of Kepler Vision Technologies said: “While it is good to see that people recognise the importance of staff and face-to-face interaction in elderly care, the huge gap in opinion between those with parents in care and those without shows that there are unfair negative perceptions around the residential care space. 

"More can and should be done by care homes to give people the confidence that their relatives will receive the very best care - by highlighting the excellent work of staff and how well they are able to monitor resident’s needs with easy-to-use technology.”

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