May 17, 2020

Drinking alcohol may increase the risk of dementia

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Alcohol
Alzheimers Association
Alzheimers Associ
Admin
2 min
Alcohol consumption could link to dementia
Follow @WDMEllaCopland People who drink moderate amounts of alcohol stand a greater risk of dementia, a...

 

People who drink ’moderate’ amounts of alcohol stand a greater risk of dementia, according to research released by the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference today.

Despite previous research suggesting that moderate alcohol consumption could be beneficial, the research suggested that those who had drank moderate alcohol in earlier life or moderately in old age can risk cognitive decline.

To read the latest edition of Healthcare Global,click here

The study tracked the health of over 20 years of 1,300 women in their late 60’s, found that the risk of dementia was higher in those who reported drinking more alcohol. Women who switched from abstinence to drinking over the course of the study also increased their risk, in addition to those who drank alcohol ‘in moderation’ (7-14 units a week). 

The scientists found that:

  • Women who reported drinking more in the past than at the beginning of the study were at 30% increased risk of developing cognitive impairment.
  • Moderate drinkers at baseline or at midpoint had similar risk of cognitive impairment to non-drinkers; however, moderate drinkers in the late phase of the study were roughly 60% more likely to develop cognitive impairment.
  • Women who changed from nondrinking to drinking over the course of the study had a 200% increased risk of cognitive impairment.

Similar research also found that binge drinking can lead to dementia-like problems. In a study of 5,075 men and women, it was discovered that those who reported heavy bouts of drinking- at least one a month- were also more likely to develop dementia-like problems later on in life. Fortnightly binges were found to double the risk.

"We know that binge drinking can be harmful," said Dr. Iain Lang of Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Exeter, who conducted the research. "For example, it can increase the risk of harm to the cardiovascular system, including the chance of developing heart disease, and it is related to increased risk of both intentional and unintentional injuries."

According to Lang, it is not clear whether binge drinking in older adults has a damaging effect on cognitive health and whether it increases the risk a person will develop dementia.

Dr Marie Janson, of Alzheimer's Research UK told the BBC:

"There is mounting evidence linking alcohol consumption to cognitive decline, but this research delves deeper by examining the effects of different drinking patterns in more detail. These researchers found that in older people, even moderate drinking may have a harmful effect, in contrast to some previous research suggesting that moderate drinking may bring benefits.”

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Jul 30, 2021

Rackspace surveys healthcare leaders' knowledge of tech

healthcare
Technology
healthtech
Leadership
2 min
Rackspace surveys healthcare leaders knowledge of tech
New survey by Rackspace looks at how well healthcare executives understand technology

A new survey sponsored by Rackspace Technology has analysed how well healthcare leaders understand technology today, compared to  five years ago. 

Rackspace polled more than 1400 IT and non-IT decision makers in companies making over $300 million a year in six industries, one of which was healthcare. 

The survey asked healthcare executives about the changing role of technology in their area, including the dangers of falling behind, their knowledge of the role of technology, and familiarity with what technology can do to the bottom-line.  

The  majority (90%) say their appreciation for application technology has grown over the past five years, and 88% now have a better understanding of technology than they did five years ago. 
They were also asked about the ways technology helps drive corporate strategies. The survey found that: 

 * 62% say automation drives efficiencies 
 * 50% say they leverage innovative technologies like IoT and cloud native applications 
 * 48% say it allows greater employee collaboration 
 * 48% say it gives them real-time analysis/customer ‘pulse’ 


Among the technologies that benefit healthcare organisations the most financially i.e. generating revenue and reducing costs: 

 * 60% say AI/machine learning 

 * 61% say cybersecurity 

 * 56% say enterprise software 

 * 45% say e-commerce 

 * 44% say SaaS 

 * 41% say IoT 

Almost half of the respondents (44%) say that if legacy applications aren’t modernised in the next two to three years, healthcare organisations may lose their ability to compete. 
Other consequences of delaying modernising applications include: 

 * 56% say they wouldn’t be able to meet new regulations 

 * 46% say they wouldn’t be able to scale up IT to meet new demands 

 * 44% say customer service levels would be reduced 

 * 36% say they wouldn’t be able to integrate 

 * 33% say poor staff morale would result from inadequate systems 

 * 33% say there would be lost productivity  

Jeff DeVerter, CTO at Rackspace Technology, commented on the research: “The results of our survey are further evidence that modernising applications through a user lens is not just a ‘nice to have’ from a customer satisfaction perspective, but also delivers a wealth of tangible, quantifiable benefits to organisations.

“Applications are a foundation of customer experience, and it is encouraging to see an increased focused and rising enthusiasm for customer experience improvements.” 

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