May 17, 2020

Garmin Health partners with the University of Kansas Medical Center

Health technology
Digital health
medical devices
medical devices
Catherine Sturman
2 min
Garmin smartwatches (Getty Images)
Garmin, a global leader in wearable technology, and the University of Kansas Medical Center, a world-class academic medical research facility, have deci...

Garmin, a global leader in wearable technology, and the University of Kansas Medical Center, a world-class academic medical research facility, have decided to partner to foster innovation and better understand how wearables can assist in the detection and management of significant medical conditions. Their initial research will focus on sleep apnoea and atrial fibrillation.

The duo is working on multiple research projects, combining high-quality sensor data from Garmin devices, with the health care expertise of KU Medical Center researchers.

“Garmin Health is excited to work with a nationally-recognised institution like KU Medical Center that is on the forefront of digital health research,” explained Scott Burgett, Director of Garmin Health Engineering.

“As patients assume increased responsibility for their own health care, Garmin is committed to the development of wearables that can lead to the prevention or detection of serious health conditions. With long battery life, high water rating, and high-quality sensor data, we can provide meaningful features that will help reduce health care costs and provide useful functionality for everyday life.”

By continuing monitoring those with known conditions, healthcare professionals will gain essential insight and gain the ability to assist in delivering a well-informed course of treatment. KU Medical Center research provides clinically based data that can aid in the development of algorithms capable of identifying conditions such as sleep apnoea and atrial fibrillation.

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Sleep apnoea affects up to 18mn US citizens. Consequently, Garmin Health has worked with Suzanne Stevens, M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology, and Catherine Siengsukon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, at KU Medical Center to study how wearables equipped with optical sensors could be used to detect sleep apnoea and provide a lower cost alternative to an overnight sleep centre evaluation.

Additionally, atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, increasing the risk of stroke by 500% and can cause heart failure. Affecting millions of people in the US, similarly to sleep apnoea, it is cumbersome and costly to detect.

“This research will help us better understand how wearables can do the same while asleep, helping to detect sleep apnoea, which left untreated can affect mood, memory, trigger heart arrhythmias, heart attacks, and even strokes,” commented Dr Stevens.

“Wearable technology capable of early detection and monitoring of heart rhythm disorders will be a revolutionary boon to cardiac care,” said Dr. Madhu Reddy, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine at KU Medical Center and Division Director, Heart Rhythm Services in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at The University of Kansas Health System.

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Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

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