May 17, 2020

GE Healthcare: the future of cybersecurity in healthcare 

Technology
Health technology
Georgia Wilson
2 min
MRI scanner and hospital worker
As the future becomes increasingly more digitally connected, GE Healthcare has launched a new service to help hospitals better protect against cyber thr...

As the future becomes increasingly more digitally connected, GE Healthcare has launched a new service to help hospitals better protect against cyber threats.

In 2018 alone, 82% of hospital technology experts reported significant security incidents, with the average data breach cost US$7.91mn in the United States.

To help hospitals combat these cybersecurity threats, GE Healthcare has developed a new solution - Skeye - which uses artificial intelligence (AI) and process management tools, to provide proactive monitoring of a hospital's resources and capabilities. Skeye’s monitoring helps detect, analyse and respond to cybersecurity threats and events in real time via a remote security operations center (SOC).

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The technology behind the solution

Skeye uses AI to automate connected device inventory and equipment risk profiling across an entire hospital, creating a dynamic management system for device onboarding and decommissioning. AI is also used alongside the SOC to analyse, monitor and manage cybersecurity vulnerabilities.

GE Healthcare describes Skeye as a 360 degree solution that starts with risk assessment, all the way through to real-time networked device discovery, regardless of the age, OEM or operating system of the device. GE Healthcare aims to provide with this solution, complete medical device security assessment to identify risks and vulnerabilities, recommended action plans and advice, as well as execution strategies.

“Our customers need visibility to what medical devices are connected to their networks and the right resources to mitigate potential threats. This new offering provides customers with 360˚ threat visibility and a resolution roadmap to help defend and protect against vulnerabilities,” said Matt Silva, Chief Information Security Officer, GE Healthcare. “Our security operations center can augment customers’ in-house security teams by addressing cybersecurity events, as well as providing the latest information on malware and other malicious threats.”.

For more information on healthcare topics - please take a look at the latest edition of Healthcare Global.

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Jul 27, 2021

 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds

NHS
carehomes
elderlycare
healthcare
2 min
 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds
NHS residential care homes provide better quality care than the private sector, a new report by Kepler Vision Technologies has found

A new survey has found that 60% of people with parents in NHS care homes believe the quality of care has improved, compared to just 49% of respondents with parents in private care facilities. 

The survey was conducted by Kepler Vision Technologies, an AI-driven company formed at the University of Amsterdam. It was carried out among UK adults with parents over the age of 75. 

Respondents cited more capable care staff and better monitoring systems as being the main reasons for improvement. 

However those who do not have parents in assisted living facilities had a different viewpoint - in this case only 35% of respondents believe that NHS facilities are improving, compared to 32% who believe it is only improving in the private sector. 

Only 18% of people whose parents live with them or independently believe care home staff are able to look after residents to a good standard.

Kepler Vision say this difference in opinion is due to perceived budget cuts and financial pressures, with 67% of people commenting that a lack of funding has had a negative effect on care in both NHS and private care facilities. 

Other key findings of the survey include: 
 * Out of those who say quality has declined in care homes, 69% say the NHS is dealing with budget cuts and increased financial pressure, while 65% also said that the private system is dealing with these pressures too
 * 55% said that they or their parent have money saved specifically to pay for their future care
 * 35% said the idea of their parent in a care home makes them feel frightened, although 32% say it makes them feel secure
 * 52% are worried about their parent catching COVID
 * 47%  are worried about their parent being lonely
 * 46% are concerned they could fall over alone

The announcement of this research follows the UK government's decision to delay presenting its social care budget till the autumn

Commenting on the research, Dr Harro Stokman, CEO of Kepler Vision Technologies said: “While it is good to see that people recognise the importance of staff and face-to-face interaction in elderly care, the huge gap in opinion between those with parents in care and those without shows that there are unfair negative perceptions around the residential care space. 

"More can and should be done by care homes to give people the confidence that their relatives will receive the very best care - by highlighting the excellent work of staff and how well they are able to monitor resident’s needs with easy-to-use technology.”

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