May 17, 2020

Global market for RFID in healthcare, pharma to reach $1.7 bln by 2018

new global report
global market for RFID in healthcare and
Admin
2 min
Global market for RFID in healthcare, pharma to reach $1.7 bln by 2018
The new global report was released by a publisher of off-the-shelf market research namely Global Industry Analyts, Inc announcing that the global marke...

The new global report was released by a publisher of off-the-shelf market research namely Global Industry Analyts, Inc announcing that the global market for RFID in healthcare and pharmaceutical markets will reach $1.7 billion by the year 2018.

The report entitled RFID in Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals: A Global Strategic Business Report, GIA attributes the growth of major factors like the additional functionality offered by RFID when up against conventional technologies, technological advances, and rising issues counterfeiting and re-labeling of expired drugs in the pharma industry.

RFID is used in healthcare and pharmaceutical industries on demand for real-time locating systems (RTLS) and its use in the locating equipment, patients and staff, and in enhancing safety and efficiency of healthcare delivery.

Apart from this, tagging of drugs at item-level will wipe out the entry of counterfeit drugs and also allow pharma companies to point out the exact location of a particular stock in case of a recall, record when a patient has taken a drug and even communicate with them.

The growth is also driven by other factors like the rising adoption of technology in countries like the South Korea and the U.S. and also the drive to lessen operational losses.

Radio frequency identification is the use of a wireless non-contact system that uses radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data from a attached to an object, for the purposes of automatic identification and tracking.

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Jun 24, 2021

Jvion launches AI-powered map to tackle mental health crisis

AI
mentalhealth
dataanalytics
PredictiveAnalytics
2 min
Jvion's new interactive map uses AI to predict areas most vulnerable to poor mental health

Clinical AI company Jvion has launched an interactive map  of the US that highlights areas that are most vulnerable to poor mental health. 

The Behavioral Health Vulnerability Map uses Jvion's AI CORE™ software to analyse public data on social determinants of health (SDOH)  and determine the vulnerability of every US Census block group. 

Vulnerability refers to the likelihood that residents will experience issues like self-harm, suicide attempts or overdoses. The map also identifies the most influential social determinants in each region, to show the social and environmental conditions that contribute to mental illness. 

As an example, the map shows that Harrison County in Mississippi has a 50% higher suicide rate than the rest of the state. It also shows a high percentage of individuals in the armed forces at a time when active duty suicides are at a six-year high, along with a high prevalence of coronary artery disease, arthritis, and COPD, all chronic illnesses that are linked to a higher suicide risk.  

The map also shows Harrison County has a high percentage of Vietnamese Americans, who studies suggest have high rates of depression and may be less likely to seek help from mental health professionals. 

The map was built using the same data and analytics that Jvion used to create the COVID Community Vulnerability Map, which was launched towards the start of the pandemic. 

With this new map, Jvion is aiming to tackle the growing mental health crisis in the US. “At a time when so many Americans are struggling with their mental health, we’re proud to offer a tool that can help direct treatment resources to the communities that need it most,” said Dr John Showalter, MD, Jvion’s chief product officer, who led the development of the map. 

“For too long, the healthcare industry has struggled to address social determinants of health, particularly in the context of behavioural health. Our hope is that by surfacing the social and environmental vulnerabilities of America’s communities, we can better coordinate our response to the underlying conditions that impact the health and wellbeing of people everywhere.” 

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