May 17, 2020

The Hospital of Tomorrow: Can Mobile Tech Cure All Ills?

Cloud
mHealth
VOIP
Telemedicine
Admin
6 min
New technologies in the health care industry will allow for the patient experience to be transformed.
Aruba Networks discusses how mobile technology is creating a radical shift in the future of health care.

For many governments, how a country looks afte...

Aruba Networks discusses how mobile technology is creating a radical shift in the future of health care.

For many governments, how a country looks after its own health is often the cornerstone of any successful political campaign. Even if budgets rise for health care systems, ageing populations mean that health services are being stretched more than ever. So, where do health care organisations even begin to try and become more streamlined and deliver a service that’s equivalent to other industries?

To continue to meet performance goals, the global health care system has to evolve and mobile technology will be at the very heart of this change. Technology is key to any 21st century business and health care is no different. The hospital of tomorrow will be a shadow of what it is today and if the right decisions are made, technology innovation will start to deliver huge benefits; not just to hospitals but the patients it supports.

We believe the hospital of 2025 will:

1. Be 50 percent more efficient through the birth of the ‘mCloud’.

The mCloud will be a centralised, secure hub used for storing patient information that is accessible anywhere and anytime across the globe. A centralised hub will mean tomorrow’s medical records will be stored entirely on a private and secure cloud service that can be accessed wherever and whenever required. This will drive efficiencies through the roof.

mCloud allows hospitals to be part of a global, safe and secure network that gives doctors a broader set of records and a much more robust and holistic view of a patient. The money saved on issues like incorrect diagnosis could be reinvested into R&D departments allowing health care organisations to expand at a much quicker rate than they are doing today.

[READ MORE] How Cloud Computing is Changing the Health Care IT Industry

This centralised system will be enabled by an advanced Wi-Fi network experience that allows for the real time prioritisation of data. This will save valuable time on diagnosis. Location services enabled by mobile technology will result in pieces of medical equipment being located much faster; items such as heart monitoring and other large diagnostic equipment will be easily located inside hospitals meaning patients will have access to the machines much quicker than is happening now. Beyond this, location-based mobile will give much more refined and detailed location services inside a building so doctors can track and trace things much quicker.

2. Reduce misdiagnosis by 75 percent through the partnership of real-time data and mobile technology.

Health care has traditionally lagged behind other key industries in terms of innovation – perhaps due to issues surrounding patient confidentiality. However, the hospital of tomorrow will make use of real-time data through the use of mobile software and devices, all allowing for more accurate diagnosis giving consultants greater visibility into a patients ailments and reducing misdiagnosis by over 75 percent.

These rising levels of accuracy will also be driven by GenMobile who will be sharing data on mobile devices such as smartphones, wearables and tablets. As more and more hospitals become reliant on networks, IT security will become paramount so departments will need to invest heavily in order to alleviate some of the concerns often associated with network security.

From a management point of view, staffing levels will be much easier to control through the predictive capabilities of big data. Using mobile technology will see the rise of ‘virtual assistants’ meaning that facilities are managed in a much more efficient way. The management of beds will also mean patients are less likely to be waiting around for an empty bed, if beds are full or are about to become free, ward managers can be alerted to this in real time via their mobile device and react more effectively.

3. Deliver a truly paperless and wireless world driving better confidentiality and collaboration.

Whilst it’s not believed all working environments will be paperless, there is a big push for many industries to go that way and health care is no different. The money spent on purchasing paper and document storage will reduce by over 80 percent equating to millions, if not billions, of pounds saved each year. Regional data centers vs. one central hub has been suggested as a way of easing many people’s fears that their records could be compromised, but as long as assurances over security are met, a paperless environment would have huge benefits to confidentiality. Within radiology, RIS and PACS systems have already led to paperless departments, saving space, time and enabling remote diagnosis from experts around the globe.

The implementation of wireless communications systems and VoIP goes hand in hand with this decline of the paper world. Doctors will be able to communicate and collaborate with either individuals or groups with the touch of a button. The response time will be instantaneous and, by having all the right people are involved in the decision making process throughout, this will reduce errors and misdiagnosis. Poor communication will be a thing of the past.

4. Be a customised and smart patient experience.

The hospital of tomorrow will be fully mobile, personalised and will resemble a modern day hotel.

With the traditional hospital consulting room showing minimal improvement since World War 2, many health care organisations have started to focus on ‘smart rooms’ which will completely revolutionise the patient experience. The rooms of tomorrow will be entirely connected and have the ability to communicate not just with consultants but also with the hospital as a whole. The hospitals' own personalised app will be at the very center of this. Computers and networks will connect both inside and outside the room. Remote consulting, which is already being trialled across various European countries will become the norm.

[READ MORE] 4 Reasons Telemedicine Will Trend Upward in 2015

We’ll also start to see hospitals use their own apps to enable patients to make appointments through their mobile devices. Patients and visitors will be able to locate amenities once in the hospital, send and receive personalised messages to nurses and physicians, and access diagnostic results electronically just a handful of benefits. The bedside care of patients will transform in a huge way with mobility at the very core. Results of tests such as x-rays can be shared in an instant with decisions on next steps being made much quicker than they are today. Doctors will then be able to share information with each other digitally which means patients will no longer be waiting hours for guidance on next steps.

The Road to the Future

While the hospital of tomorrow is undoubtedly some years from becoming a reality, the technology is in place to begin the transformation now.

It begins with a review of hospital networks and an understanding of who needs to use it. Medical staff, patients and visitors need to use the facilities in very different ways and with different devices, but we now have the capabilities to cater to each of these preferences.

In order for health care organisations to take this towards becoming smarter, more efficient and more comfortable for their patients, leaders need to start considering, and building around, the digital age. 

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Jun 23, 2021

Introducing Dosis - the AI powered dosing platform

AI
medication
personalisedmedicine
chronicdisease
3 min
Dosis is an AI-powered personalised medication dosing platform that's on a mission to transform chronic disease management

Cloud-based platform Dosis uses AI to help patients and clinicians tailor their medication plans. Shivrat Chhabra, CEO and co-founder, tells us how it works. 

When and why was Dosis founded?
Divya, my co-founder and I founded Dosis in 2017 with the purpose of creating a personalised dosing platform. We see personalisation in so many aspects of our lives, but not in the amount of medication we receive. We came across some research at the University of Louisville that personalised the dosing of a class of drugs called ESAs that are used to treat chronic anaemia. We thought, if commercialised, this could greatly benefit the healthcare industry by introducing precision medicine to drug dosing. 

The research also showed that by taking this personalised approach, less drugs were needed to achieve the same or better outcomes. That meant that patients were exposed to less medication, so there was a lower likelihood of side effects. It also meant that the cost of care was reduced. 

What is the Strategic Anemia Advisor? 
Dosis’s flagship product, Strategic Anemia Advisor (SAA), personalises the dosing of Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESAs). ESAs are a class of drugs used to treat chronic anaemia, a common complication of chronic kidney disease. 

SAA takes into account a patient’s previous ESA doses and lab levels, determines the patient’s unique response to the drug and outputs an ESA dose recommendation to keep the patient within a specified therapeutic target range. Healthcare providers use SAA as a clinical decision support tool. 

What else is Dosis working on? 
In the near term, we are working on releasing a personalised dosing module for IV iron, another drug that’s used in tandem with ESAs to treat chronic anaemia. We’re also working on personalising the dosing for the three drugs used to treat Mineral Bone Disorder. We’re very excited to expand our platform to these new drugs. 

What are Dosis' strategic goals for the next 2-3 years? 
We strongly believe that personalised dosing will be the standard of care within the next decade, and we’re honored to be a part of making that future a reality. In the next few years, we see Dosis entering partnerships with other companies that operate within value-based care environments, where tools like ours that help reduce cost while maintaining or improving outcomes are extremely useful.

What do you think AI's greatest benefits to healthcare are?
If designed well, AI in healthcare allows for a practical and usable way to deploy solutions that would not be feasible otherwise. For example, it’s possible for someone to manually solve the mathematical equations necessary to personalise drug dosing, but it is just not practical. AI in healthcare offers an exciting path forward for implementing solutions that for so long have appeared impractical or impossible.

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