May 17, 2020

How Australian hospitals are using video games to help patients recover

Xbox
Nintendo Wii
Australia
stroke
Admin
2 min
A new technology called ‘FysioGaming’ provides real-time information to physiotherapitsts.
A recent study in Australia has revealed playing computer games may help patients recover quicker from strokes, amputations, brain injuries and other co...

A recent study in Australia has revealed playing computer games may help patients recover quicker from strokes, amputations, brain injuries and other conditions.

Cathie Sherrington, principal research fellow at the George Institute for Global Health, is leading the study, as patients in Australian hospitals are playing games on Xbox, Nintendo Wii in addition to other games developed specifically for rehabilitation.

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“There’s quite a lot of diversity in the range of problems that people experience after a stroke or brain injury,” said Sherrington. “So it’s likely that different technologies will be more suited to different individuals.”

A new technology developed in the Netherlands called ‘FysioGaming’ provides real-time information to physiotherapitsts, with feedback detailing how patients are performing in target activities. The movement-based computer programs help stroke survivors re-master basic skills and reward them with on-screen prizes to motivate them even more to move while their progress is tracked.

RELATED TOPIC: Report: OCED reveals Australia healthcare lags behind in data and technology

A stepping tile system was developed specifically for this research and was made with a 3D printer, allowing flexibility to customize the steps for each patient. Therapists assist patients through several specific exercises on the stepping tile system, and receive feedback on how they performed in weight distribution, balance and strength.

Once patients learn how to use the game therapy at the hospital, they are encouraged to continue making strides toward recovery in their own home. Because of this, researchers are working on ways to make the gaming technology accessible on smartphones and other mobile devices.

RELATED TOPIC: How Australia is using 3D printing to improve cranial reconstruction

Researchers follow their patients for six month to evaluate whether or not the technology has helped increase their independence. It all adds up to give patients a promising outlook to regain movement and mobility.

Source: Australia News Network

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Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

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