May 17, 2020

Ransomware single biggest threat to healthcare data security

Data
Security
Ransomware
NTT Security 2017 Global Threat Intelligence Report
Admin
2 min
Ransomware single biggest threat to healthcare data security
Ransomware is the single biggest threat to healthcare data security according to a recent report. This revealed that around 50 percent of data security...

Ransomware is the single biggest threat to healthcare data security according to a recent report. This revealed that around 50 percent of data security incidents from October 2015 to September 2016 stemmed from healthcare ransomware attacks.

The NTT Security 2017 Global Threat Intelligence Report showed that healthcare also contributed to nearly three-quarters of ransomware attacks globally. Healthcare, professional services, government, and retail together accounted for 77 percent of ransomware attacks. 

"Our end goal is not to create fear, uncertainty and doubt or to overcomplicate the current state of the threat landscape, but to make cybersecurity interesting and inclusive for anyone facing the challenges of security attacks, not just security professionals,” NTT Security GTIC Threat Intelligence & Incident Response Vice President Steven Bullitt said in a statement.

“While there is no indication that healthcare devices have been incorporated into DDoS botnets, it may be only a matter of time before an adversary adapt an IoT malware such as Mirai, to harness the computational resources of medical devices because many lack basic access controls such as multi-factor authentication (or any authentication whatsoever),” ICIT Senior Fellow James Scott and ICIT Researcher Drew Spaniel wrote.

But it’s not all bad news for data protection in healthcare. The report also indicated that industries are improving their response plans. 32 percent of organisations had a formal incident response plan, an increase from 23 percent in previous years.

59 percent of all incident response engagements were in the top four industries. Healthcare accounted for 17 percent, finance accounted for 16 percent, and business and professional services accounted for 14 percent. Retail rounded up the top four with 12 percent of the incident response engagements.

Source - [Healthitsecurity]

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Jun 22, 2021

NeuTigers: edge AI in healthcare

edgecomputing
edgeAI
AI
prediction
3 min
We take a look at edge AI and how NeuTigers is driving this forward in healthcare

What is edge AI? 

Edge AI is essentially a combination of edge computing and artificial intelligence. Algorithms are processed locally - directly on a mobile device or server - rather than in the cloud. This reduces cost, computing power and energy requirements. There are also claims that edge AI is so fast it is possible to reach near real-time analytics

Edge AI devices include smart speakers, smart phones, laptops, robots, self-driven cars, drones, and surveillance cameras that use video analytics. 

Who is NeuTigers? 

NeuTigers is a spin-off company from Princeton University, formed in 2018 to apply edge AI and machine learning to solve challenges in healthcare, energy, productivity, and security. 

With offices in Princeton, NJ, the company is based at one of the top AI accelerator programs of FutureLabs in New York, and has also established a subsidiary in Nice, France.

How is NeuTigers applying edge AI to healthcare? 

The NeuTigers AI Technology Stack uses deep  neural networks that mimic how the human brain perceives and interprets the world. The company has developed the StarDeepTM Smart Health Platform for health monitoring and biomedical imaging, to improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosing diseases. 

NeuTigers say the platform has the potential to monitor and screen for thousands of conditions,  when used in combination with medical devices and  smart sensors already deployed in healthcare settings. 

Are there any real world examples? 

In January NeuTigers launched CovidDeep, a tool that predicts COVID-19 with more than 90% accuracy, using physiological data from a wristband along with blood pressure and blood oxygen readings. It then analyses the data and gives a prediction within two minutes. 

This week NeuTigers announced a new study to detect the early signs of  complications with sickle cell anaemia.  Conducted at a hospital in Paris, the research will begin by looking at changes to skin response, heart beat, sleep and temperature to predict an acute episode of sickle cell anaemia, and how this impacts on the patients’ disease conditions and quality of life. 

The second phase of the project is to expand with prospective studies across different sites in EU, Africa  and the US to explore the models' accuracy and clinical effectiveness. 

They say...

Adel Laoui, CEO and founder of NeuTigers, says: “The best way to deal with a crisis is to avoid it happening in the first place. We are now entering a new era where medical early warning systems have become a reality. 

“We are excited at the possibility of deploying a technology that can save lives of patients dealing with sickle cell anaemia. The potential of the StarDeep platform to dramatically improve patient outcomes while slashing some of the highest costs of healthcare makes it one of the most exciting developments in preventative personal medicine.”

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