May 17, 2020

Telemedicine and mobile technology inspire U.S. and China

North America
Asia
Telemedicine
Mobile Technology
Admin
2 min
American Telemedicine Association; sourced via Google images
Once again in contention with one another, these two world powers are vying for control of up-and-coming telemedicine and mHealth strategies which can n...

Once again in contention with one another, these two world powers are vying for control of up-and-coming telemedicine and mHealth strategies which can not only better support its people, but can take their entire healthcare platform to the next level. A recent report releases the Top Four changes policymakers would like to see mHealth deliver in the healthcare field.

In the attempt to reduce healthcare costs, assist aging populations, access disparities and chronic illnesses which threaten daily life, the traditional healthcare system no longer seems to hold-up when put in the modernized ways in which the world operates today.

As healthcare initiatives present challenges to struggling nations around the country, two of the world’s most successful countries have continued to push past the established boundaries and broken into new levels of success. For the United States and China, the ever-changing capabilities of the healthcare world not only present an interesting competition in terms of who will best-serve its people, but provide interesting industry benchmarks when analyzing what investments, decisions and initiatives work for the respective countries, and which do not.

Mobile technology and telemedicine seem to be the answers to today’s modern medical problems, as scholars from the U.S. and China pave the way to ending the present problems in today’s healthcare markets. In a recent report by Yu Xiaohui, Han Han, Du Jiadong, Wei Liurong, Li Cheng, Zhang Xueli, Li Haihua, Huang Ying, Sun Ke, Li Na, Darrell M. West and Joshua Bleiberg, proposed solutions to the plaguing problems facing healthcare professionals today are attempted to be solved through the marvel that is mHealth.

Pulled directly from the report, the authors suggest four ideas that policymakers can extol and undertake to speed the development and adoption of mHealth:

1. Mobile devices offer the potential to improve affordability of health care by lowering disparities based on geography and income. 

2. Public officials should reimburse health providers who offer consultations, diagnoses, and treatment through remote monitoring devices and other types of mobile technologies;

3. Mobile phones aid the patient experience by providing a means to deliver medical reminders and diagnostic information to patients and physicians. 

4. mHealth helps policymakers by encouraging better health data collection and analysis. 

 

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Jun 24, 2021

Jvion launches AI-powered map to tackle mental health crisis

AI
mentalhealth
dataanalytics
PredictiveAnalytics
2 min
Jvion's new interactive map uses AI to predict areas most vulnerable to poor mental health

Clinical AI company Jvion has launched an interactive map  of the US that highlights areas that are most vulnerable to poor mental health. 

The Behavioral Health Vulnerability Map uses Jvion's AI CORE™ software to analyse public data on social determinants of health (SDOH)  and determine the vulnerability of every US Census block group. 

Vulnerability refers to the likelihood that residents will experience issues like self-harm, suicide attempts or overdoses. The map also identifies the most influential social determinants in each region, to show the social and environmental conditions that contribute to mental illness. 

As an example, the map shows that Harrison County in Mississippi has a 50% higher suicide rate than the rest of the state. It also shows a high percentage of individuals in the armed forces at a time when active duty suicides are at a six-year high, along with a high prevalence of coronary artery disease, arthritis, and COPD, all chronic illnesses that are linked to a higher suicide risk.  

The map also shows Harrison County has a high percentage of Vietnamese Americans, who studies suggest have high rates of depression and may be less likely to seek help from mental health professionals. 

The map was built using the same data and analytics that Jvion used to create the COVID Community Vulnerability Map, which was launched towards the start of the pandemic. 

With this new map, Jvion is aiming to tackle the growing mental health crisis in the US. “At a time when so many Americans are struggling with their mental health, we’re proud to offer a tool that can help direct treatment resources to the communities that need it most,” said Dr John Showalter, MD, Jvion’s chief product officer, who led the development of the map. 

“For too long, the healthcare industry has struggled to address social determinants of health, particularly in the context of behavioural health. Our hope is that by surfacing the social and environmental vulnerabilities of America’s communities, we can better coordinate our response to the underlying conditions that impact the health and wellbeing of people everywhere.” 

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