May 17, 2020

Telemedicine is a high priority but the market remains immature, Sage Growth Partners reports

Telemedicine
Technology
healthcare services
Telemedicine
Catherine Sturman
3 min
telemedicine (Getty Images)
With increased potential for new technologies to reshape the healthcare industry, Sage Growth Partners have looked at the way telemedicine will seek to...

With increased potential for new technologies to reshape the healthcare industry, Sage Growth Partners have looked at the way telemedicine will seek to take the industry into the next century, with increased demand for direct-to-consumer (DTC) technologies.

The survey, Defining Telemedicine’s Role: The View from the C-Suite, looks at how the emergence of new technologies, from electronic medical records, to diagnostic imaging services, will significantly impact the way in which patients are treated in the future.

Despite this. limited budgets, resources, changing regulations and continual concerns surrounding access to universal healthcare coverage for those in areas of poor healthcare infrastructure, have led providers to hold back on adopting telemedicine services.

With research conducted with over 100 healthcare executives, the survey looks at how telemedicine will transform the delivery of patient care. Over half of its respondents (56%) have stated that telemedicine has been adopted at their organisations, whilst the majority of non-adopters have placed it as a priority.

Highlighting the long-term potential to connect patients to providers and reshape specialist areas of care, such as neurology or neonatology, increased data protection and integration remain key drivers in the adoption of new healthcare services and solutions.

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“On the higher end of the acuity spectrum, emergent use cases such as telestroke have become more mature, to the point that they are widely acknowledged to have transformed the standard of care,” the report states.

“On the other hand, the value proposition of in-home remote patient monitoring (RPM) is evolving under value-based reimbursement, as organisations seek to enable elderly patients to age at home as they attempt to manage the total cost of care, often spurred by triggering events such as financial penalties for readmissions.”

A high number of healthcare providers are either working, or planning to work with a number of vendors to implement new, telemedicine solutions to support the growth of a consumer-centric healthcare model.

“We are looking at telemedicine as a program that can expand our reach, making it more convenient for existing patients, or allowing us to attract new patients into our system. With millennials, being seen at their convenience is more important than building a relationship with a physician over time,” one COO who undertook the survey has noted.

Surprisingly, the majority of healthcare professionals surveyed have also stated that although building a solution in house would lower costs of implementing telemedicine solutions, it would have limited resources in maintaining such a complex technology. Over half of healthcare executives surveyed have partnered with telemedicine vendors who can provide the required expertise to deliver a comprehensive solution across its healthcare domains.

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Jul 27, 2021

 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds

NHS
carehomes
elderlycare
healthcare
2 min
 NHS care homes are better than private, report finds
NHS residential care homes provide better quality care than the private sector, a new report by Kepler Vision Technologies has found

A new survey has found that 60% of people with parents in NHS care homes believe the quality of care has improved, compared to just 49% of respondents with parents in private care facilities. 

The survey was conducted by Kepler Vision Technologies, an AI-driven company formed at the University of Amsterdam. It was carried out among UK adults with parents over the age of 75. 

Respondents cited more capable care staff and better monitoring systems as being the main reasons for improvement. 

However those who do not have parents in assisted living facilities had a different viewpoint - in this case only 35% of respondents believe that NHS facilities are improving, compared to 32% who believe it is only improving in the private sector. 

Only 18% of people whose parents live with them or independently believe care home staff are able to look after residents to a good standard.

Kepler Vision say this difference in opinion is due to perceived budget cuts and financial pressures, with 67% of people commenting that a lack of funding has had a negative effect on care in both NHS and private care facilities. 

Other key findings of the survey include: 
 * Out of those who say quality has declined in care homes, 69% say the NHS is dealing with budget cuts and increased financial pressure, while 65% also said that the private system is dealing with these pressures too
 * 55% said that they or their parent have money saved specifically to pay for their future care
 * 35% said the idea of their parent in a care home makes them feel frightened, although 32% say it makes them feel secure
 * 52% are worried about their parent catching COVID
 * 47%  are worried about their parent being lonely
 * 46% are concerned they could fall over alone

The announcement of this research follows the UK government's decision to delay presenting its social care budget till the autumn

Commenting on the research, Dr Harro Stokman, CEO of Kepler Vision Technologies said: “While it is good to see that people recognise the importance of staff and face-to-face interaction in elderly care, the huge gap in opinion between those with parents in care and those without shows that there are unfair negative perceptions around the residential care space. 

"More can and should be done by care homes to give people the confidence that their relatives will receive the very best care - by highlighting the excellent work of staff and how well they are able to monitor resident’s needs with easy-to-use technology.”

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