May 17, 2020

Tight economic times call for tighter hospital regulations

Admin
3 min
Tight Economic Times Call for Tighter Hospital Regulations.jpg
Written by Tina Samuels The bane of any company or organization is a thief. When people begin stealing in the workplace it is annoying, frustrating an...

Written by Tina Samuels

 

The bane of any company or organization is a thief.

When people begin stealing in the workplace it is annoying, frustrating and at times it can be dangerous. No place is stealing more dangerous than in a hospital.

This danger can stem from someone stealing from patients who will be upset and report the facility or from the thief stealing medications. The thief or even someone they know could end up dead from ingesting dangerous drugs. Do you know what to do about such thieves?

So, is your hospital prepared and protected against such actions?

Catching Them

How do you catch a thief?

Video surveillance is the best way to catch people stealing. While you can't keep video cameras in patient rooms, you can keep them in the hallways.

Rooms or closets that have missing items can usually be traced back to the people entering them. People entering often could be suspects. You can talk to the people that are seen entering the rooms and make a note of when items vanish.

If the same person is caught on video entering the rooms where items are missing, but the other people are different, it is a good bet you are on the trail of a thief.

Baggage Checks

This tactic is used in airports and government buildings; there's no reason that it cannot be used in a hospital.

If things are coming up missing you should distribute a form for employees to sign. The form should entail new regulations where security guards may inspect purses or backpacks in the event that there is a reasonable belief that an employee is stealing.

Before adding such a regulation check with your lawyer. There may be laws that do not allow you to perform such searches unless there is an officer present or a reasonable doubt concerning the person to be searched. Many localities to allow searches of bags or metal detection.

Contact the Authorities

If you do find that an employee is stealing, the best course of action is to confront the staff member. If they refuse to leave the premises, return stolen items, or become violent - contact the authorities.

Stealing from an employer is as bad as any other crime of this nature, though many people seem to think that stealing from work is 'ok'. Hospitals care for the vulnerable and provide strong drugs - this is a dangerous mix.

Not only can the thief get in a lot of trouble for stealing from their employer, the patient stolen from (if a patient is involved) can press charges, and there may be drug-related charges if drugs are stolen. Even worse is when a thief is stealing drugs to sell on the street.

Strong regulations, severe consequences, and sticking to a plan can help weed out or deter any thieves in your hospital.

Keep security staff funded with the best technology and if possible have an actual police officer on premises in case someone is caught stealing red handed. Security officers can only do so much in certain situations, but a police officer can make an arrest.

In a day and age when crimes are more common due to a challenged economy, don’t let your hospital get caught with its guard down.

 

About the Author

Tina Samuels writes on small business reputation, business tactics, marketing, and social media.

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Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

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