May 17, 2020

US company LifeFolder aims to support people with end-of-life planning

Technology
healthcare services
healthcare services
Technology
Catherine Sturman
2 min
US company LifeFolder aims to support 25-45-year olds through a new technology to deliver end-of-life planning needs to individuals who need it most. It...

US company LifeFolder aims to support 25-45-year olds through a new technology to deliver end-of-life planning needs to individuals who need it most. It will help create three documents which help individuals discuss their wishes and needs, and provide exceptional care support.

Approximately 80% of Americans have not planned for what they would like planned with regards to their end-of-life care. The company’s chatbot, named Emily, will be able to spend as much time as possible with individuals, and help them be able to discuss their needs with their loved ones, on what would otherwise be a complex subject.  

The bot provides much needed conversations with users, and takes the place of a professional nurse, who would inform the user about key topic areas and provide further information on required elements. The free Facebook Messenger bot explains the decisions a user has to make, and supports the completion of legal paperwork to prepare for end of life. In assisting with these documents, the bot also supports the creation of a Health Proxy nomination, which enables users to select who they would like to speak on their behalf, if they become unable.

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“Our advance health care directive becomes necessary in situations that are stressful. If you have an illness or if you’re in an accident, doctors may ask your proxies to make decisions for you,” explains Haje Jan Kamps, CEO of LifeFolder

The second element is putting forth a set of priorities and wishes, which has been set out in an Advance Directive. The document outlines what users do and don't want from their health care. Thirdly, how the user feels about organ donation and whether they would be a willing donor.

"We've tested our bot Emily with hundreds of people so far,” adds Kamps. “The response has been overwhelmingly positive.

We were worried that perhaps people wouldn't be ready to talk to a chatbot about a topic as sensitive as death, but instead, we found the opposite. Chatbots are particularly good at not being judgmental, and being extremely patient."

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Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

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