May 17, 2020

Who are the most active healthcare CIOs on Twitter?

Global healthcare
Twitter
CIOs
Healthcare CIOs
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3 min
Who are the most active healthcare CIOs on Twitter?
Since the first edition of the Huffington Posts most active chief information officers on Twitter, healthcare leadership execs have stepped up to the pl...

Since the first edition of the Huffington Post’s most active chief information officers on Twitter, healthcare leadership execs have stepped up to the plate to increase their online presence. Today, healthcare CIOs account for 8 percent of the Post’s 100 most social CIOs on Twitter; ranging from diverse specialties: IT officials, nonprofit gurus and healthcare systems officials, who have joined the online marketplace of healthcare activity.

This increased online presence should not come as a surprise to healthcare professionals, due to the need for virtual marketing and constant social media interaction. It has proven to be just as important as presenting a quality product and service, because if no one is talking about you, then who will buy your product?

MedCity News has provided the following list of the 10 most sociable healthcare CIOs as a resource to healthcare professionals everywhere:

Will Weider (@CandidCIO) is the CIO for Ministry Health and authors the blog Candid CIO

My organization has 1,032 reports with ICD codes that need to be fixed as part of the ICD10 transition. How about yours?

— Will Weider (@CandidCIO) March 21, 2014

John Halamka (@jhalamka) is the CIO for Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and authors the blog Life as a Healthcare CIO.

Wearable Computing at BIDMC: Over the past few months, Beth Israel Deaconess has been the pilot site for a new… — John Halamka (@jhalamka) March 12, 2014

Steve Downs (@stephenjdowns) is the CTO and CIO for Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

A conversation w/ Kevin Patrick, @zenchaos @lorimelichar and myself on the promise of #qs data for research: http://t.co/vrn8XK8Nxk — Steve Downs (@stephenjdowns) March 31, 2014

Steve Huffman (@SteveHuffmanCIO) is the CIO for Beacon Health System

Proving again the #ICD10 delay won’t help CIO’s, we are all receiving TONS of requests for projects now that ICD10 is delayed. #docfix — Steve Huffman (@SteveHuffmanCIO) April 2, 2014

Mary Sobiechowski (@msobie) is the CIO of Kantar Health

Finalist new wearable concepts for multiple biometrics #ciomove #cebit works with all apps for data capture COSINUSS pic.twitter.com/etqRQ06y7h — Mary Sobiechowski (@msobie) March 10, 2014

Kevin More (@kmmore) is the CIO for Human Service and Healthcare.org for May Institute, a nonprofit that offers educational, rehabilitative, and behavioral healthcare services to individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities.

Jump into the SM Flow RT @tomcatalini: “How Being Social Has Made Me A Better CIO” by @PhilKomarny https://t.co/QRgOtSJM65 — Kevin More (@kmmore) March 31, 2014

Glenn Lanteigne (@GlennLanteigne) is the CIO of medical laboratory services business LifeLabs

Did you know that its National Medical Laboratory Week (LabWeek) Apr21-25 to promote awareness of role of medical labs in life @LifeLabs — Glenn Lanteigne (@GlennLanteigne) March 18, 2014

Bill Swavely (@bswavely) is the CIO for BioTelemetry, the company formerly known as CardioNet.

RT @SimplyAfterDark Twitter Tips for Beginners: Everything I Wish I Knew When I Started: http://t.co/NtjsXEQPTi pic.twitter.com/yfyLHn9UKX

— Bill Swavely (@bswavely) April 2, 2014

 

David Chou (@dchou1107) is the CIO for the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

53% of clinicians use tablets daily #mhealth

— David Chou (@dchou1107) April 2, 2014

Jay Ferro (@JayFerro) is the CIO for the American Cancer Society.

Imagination is the highest form of research. ~Albert Einstein #cio #leadership

— Jay Ferro (@jayferro) April 2, 2014



 

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Jun 18, 2021

Skin Analytics wins NHSX award for AI skin cancer tool 

AI
NHS
skincancer
Cancer
2 min
Skin Analytics uses AI to detect skin cancer and will be deployed across the NHS to ease patient backlogs

An artificial intelligence-driven tool that identifies skin cancers has received an award from NHSX, the NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care's initiative to bring technology into the UK's national health system. 

NHSX has granted the Artificial Intelligence in Health and Care Award to DERM, an AI solution that can identify 11 types of skin lesion. 

Developed by Skin Analytics, DERM analyses images of skin lesions using algorithms. Within primary care, Skin Analytics will be used as an additional tool to help doctors with their decision making. 

In secondary care, it enables AI telehealth hubs to support dermatologists with triage, directing patients to the right next step. This will help speed up diagnosis, and patients with benign skin lesions can be identified earlier, redirecting them away from dermatology departments that are at full capacity due to the COVID-19 backlog. 

Cancer Research has called the impact of the pandemic on cancer services "devastating", with a 42% drop in the number of people starting cancer treatment after screening. 

DERM is already in use at University Hospitals Birmingham and Mid and South Essex Health & Care Partnership, where it has led to a significant reduction in unnecessary referrals to hospital.

Now NHSX have granted it the Phase 4 AI in Health and Care Award, making DERM available to clinicians across the country. Overall this award makes £140 million available over four years to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Dr Lucy Thomas, Consultant Dermatologist at Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, said: “Skin Analytics’ receipt of this award is great news for the NHS and dermatology departments. It will allow us to gather real-world data to demonstrate the benefits of AI on patient pathways and workforce challenges. 

"Like many services, dermatology has severe backlogs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This award couldn't have come at a better time to aid recovery and give us more time with the patients most in need of our help.”

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