May 17, 2020

World's first degree in plastic surgery launches in UK

plastic surgery
Cosmetic surgery
degree
MSc in Plastic an
Admin
3 min
Professor James Frame (right) performing a facelift
The worlds first university degree that specialises in aesthetic plastic surgery will be launched in the UK this year. Anglia Ruskin University in Esse...

The world’s first university degree that specialises in aesthetic plastic surgery will be launched in the UK this year.

Anglia Ruskin University in Essex, England, will be offering the post-graduate course – an MSc in Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery Practice – when the new academic year starts in September.

The course was inspired by the recent fiasco over faulty PIP breast implants and aims to increase standards and consumer confidence in the field of cosmetic surgery.

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Currently, the training of plastic surgeons in the UK is overseen by the Royal College of Surgeons.

They are trained to a competency level that allows safe surgery management with the type of work carried out in the NHS, but this does not include cosmetic surgery.

But since the PIP breast implants scandal, many plastic surgeons have called for training regulations to be tightened.

The Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery Practice course will be led by a group of leading UK-based plastic surgeons, including Professor James Frame, Paul Levick, Adrian Richards and James McDiarmid.

Commenting on the launch of the post-graduate course, Professor Frame said: “Aesthetic plastic surgery is a rapidly enlarging, super-speciality that requires recognition in its own right.

“The primary intention of developing this qualification is to improve patient safety and raise public awareness through best practice.

He continued: “At present a newly-qualified, fully-accredited plastic surgeon is released, totally lacking any experience in aesthetic plastic surgery, and is able to operate in the private sector.”

“This degree will benefit surgeons and therefore should improve the quality of surgery that patients receive.”

By improving the training and education of plastic surgeons in the UK, Anglia Ruskin University is hoping people will be deterred from going aboard for aesthetic procedures for what it describes as “safari surgery.”

Professor Frame added: “If aesthetic surgery is recognised as a speciality, with its own qualification, then clearly the public will benefit because it will help them to easily identify and employ a qualified surgeon here in the UK.

“At present there are too many under-qualified surgeons, particularly from elsewhere in the EU, coming over here and operating.

“The low price of flying abroad for cosmetic surgery can also be appealing but poor aftercare is a serious issue and the NHS spends millions of pounds each year rectifying problems caused by people undergoing cosmetic surgery outside the UK,” he said.

The MSc in Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery Practice will be open to all accredited plastic surgeons based in the UK and will run from Anglia Ruskin's Postgraduate Medical Institute in Chelmsford.

From 2013, the course will be made available to overseas plastic surgeons.

After completing the MSc course, students will have the option to proceed to a full doctorate in Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.

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Jun 23, 2021

Introducing Dosis - the AI powered dosing platform

AI
medication
personalisedmedicine
chronicdisease
3 min
Dosis is an AI-powered personalised medication dosing platform that's on a mission to transform chronic disease management

Cloud-based platform Dosis uses AI to help patients and clinicians tailor their medication plans. Shivrat Chhabra, CEO and co-founder, tells us how it works. 

When and why was Dosis founded?
Divya, my co-founder and I founded Dosis in 2017 with the purpose of creating a personalised dosing platform. We see personalisation in so many aspects of our lives, but not in the amount of medication we receive. We came across some research at the University of Louisville that personalised the dosing of a class of drugs called ESAs that are used to treat chronic anaemia. We thought, if commercialised, this could greatly benefit the healthcare industry by introducing precision medicine to drug dosing. 

The research also showed that by taking this personalised approach, less drugs were needed to achieve the same or better outcomes. That meant that patients were exposed to less medication, so there was a lower likelihood of side effects. It also meant that the cost of care was reduced. 

What is the Strategic Anemia Advisor? 
Dosis’s flagship product, Strategic Anemia Advisor (SAA), personalises the dosing of Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESAs). ESAs are a class of drugs used to treat chronic anaemia, a common complication of chronic kidney disease. 

SAA takes into account a patient’s previous ESA doses and lab levels, determines the patient’s unique response to the drug and outputs an ESA dose recommendation to keep the patient within a specified therapeutic target range. Healthcare providers use SAA as a clinical decision support tool. 

What else is Dosis working on? 
In the near term, we are working on releasing a personalised dosing module for IV iron, another drug that’s used in tandem with ESAs to treat chronic anaemia. We’re also working on personalising the dosing for the three drugs used to treat Mineral Bone Disorder. We’re very excited to expand our platform to these new drugs. 

What are Dosis' strategic goals for the next 2-3 years? 
We strongly believe that personalised dosing will be the standard of care within the next decade, and we’re honored to be a part of making that future a reality. In the next few years, we see Dosis entering partnerships with other companies that operate within value-based care environments, where tools like ours that help reduce cost while maintaining or improving outcomes are extremely useful.

What do you think AI's greatest benefits to healthcare are?
If designed well, AI in healthcare allows for a practical and usable way to deploy solutions that would not be feasible otherwise. For example, it’s possible for someone to manually solve the mathematical equations necessary to personalise drug dosing, but it is just not practical. AI in healthcare offers an exciting path forward for implementing solutions that for so long have appeared impractical or impossible.

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