Jun 25, 2021

New partnership aims to transform stroke care with AI

AI
stroke
medicalimaging
radiology
2 min
Aidoc and icometrix have partnered to help clinicians detect when patients have had a stroke

Clinicians are using artificial intelligence to help triage patients they suspect may have had a stroke. 
Aidoc, a provider of AI-powered tools for medical imaging, and icometrix, a Belgian imaging firm, have teamed up to provide an advanced end-to-end AI stroke package for patients. 

The package includes icometrix’s FDA-cleared CT analysis tool and Aidoc's FDA-cleared AI stroke solution which detect bleeding inside the skull and if a stroke has happened. Aidoc's algorithms analyse medical images directly after the patient is scanned, before notifying physicians within the imaging workflow.  

It is customisable and provides cutting-edge AI-powered care coordination with real-time sharing, viewing and chatting.  

"Aidoc’s care coordination suite facilitates rapid triage and communication of patients with suspected stroke, alerting physicians and speeding up access to lifesaving treatment" explains Ariella Shoham, Vice President of Marketing at Aidoc. 

 "The solution is always-on, always running behind the scenes without requiring physician activation. Suspected stroke patients are automatically flagged directly after the scan is performed and a notification is sent simultaneously to team members including neurosurgeons, stroke teams, radiologists and emergency department physicians" she adds. 

Aidoc released its first solution for flagging and notifying of bleeds in the skull three years ago. Since then it has analysed over 3 million head CTs and used in over 500 medical centres. Aidoc’s solutions have shown their ability to aid physicians by reducing alert fatigue and improving overall patient care.
It is already in use at sites including Yale New-Haven hospital and research university UMass. Another tool, to notify clinicians of suspected brain aneurysm, is expected to be included in the suite in the coming months.

Share article